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Jack Pierson Oral History Interview Conducted by Alex Fialho for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2017

ALEX FIALHO: This is Alex Fialho interviewing Jack Pierson at Jack Pierson's home in New York City, New York, on January 16, 2017, for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic, Oral History Project.

[END OF TRACK pierso17_1of1_sd_tr01.]

ALEX FIALHO:  Okay. So let's start at the beginning. Where were you born, and can you describe your family and upbringing a little bit?

JACK PIERSON:  I was born in Plymouth, Massachusetts, which is a town that contains the smaller little town I lived in, Manomet, Massachusetts.

Ferol Sibley Warthen Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1981

Ferol Sibley Warthen (b. 1890 d. 1986)

Printmaking, Provincetown, Massachusetts

Interviewer: Robert Brown

Interview of Ferol Sibley Warthen, conducted by Robert Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at Warthen's home in Provincetown, Massachusetts, on September 3, 1981. Warthen speaks of her childhood in Columbus, Ohio; attending the Columbus Art School; studying with Alice Schille and John E. Hussey; moving to New York City in 1910 to study at the Art Students League with Kenneth Hayes Miller and William Merritt Chase; moving back to Columbus to attend university to become a teacher; teaching art and design to high school students in Columbus; moving back to New York City to work in embroidery in a millinery shop; marrying her husband, Lee Roland Warthen, in 1925 and becoming a housewife while painting in her spare time; moving to Washington DC in 1935; her landscape and watercolor paintings; influences on her work such as Blanche Lazzell, Karl Knaths, and Fukwara Jin Basuke; making her woodblock and white line prints.

Total: 2 digital files; 1:40:14; 25 pages

Kenneth Josephson Oral History Interview Conducted by Lanny Silverman for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2015

This is track one.

LANNY SILVERMAN:  This is Lanny Silverman for the Smithsonian Institute's Archives of American Art. I'm interviewing Kenneth Josephson and it's September 29, 2015.

[END OF joseph15_1of2_sd_track01_r]

This is track two.

LANNY SILVERMAN:  All right. So I guess the first question is the big one—where were you born and when?

KENNETH JOSEPHSON:  July 1, 1932, in Detroit, Michigan.

LANNY SILVERMAN:  Ah. And when you were in Detroit, Michigan, what was your family like?

Lela Marshall Hine Oral History Interview Conducted by Estill Curtis "Buck" Pennington for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1982

Lela Marshall Hine (b. 1908 d. 2002)

Arts Administrator, Norfolk, Virginia

Interviewer: Estill Curtis "Buck" Pennington

Interview with Lela Marshall Hine, conducted by Estill Curtis "Buck" Pennington for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at Norfolk, Virginia, on May 14, 1982. Hine speaks of the history of the arts in the city of Norfolk, and of the history of the Hermitage Foundation Museum.

Total: 2 digital files; 1:25:06; 23 pages

Eric Fischl and April Gornik Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert Enright for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2008

ROBERT ENRIGHT: We're at Sag Harbor. It's June 6, 2008 and I'm speaking with April Gornik and Eric Fischl for the Smithsonian Archives of American Art.

You know, I want to start with this lovely trope that you came up with that you and Eric have a figure/ground relationship; he paints the figures, you paint the ground. I think that's pretty good.

Tina Barney Oral History Interview Conducted by Merry Foresta for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2009

MERRY FORESTA: All right, we are recording. This is Merry Foresta, and I am sitting with Tina Barney on the morning of December 10, 2009 and this is the beginning of an oral history being done for the Archives of American Art.

And, Tina, would you just like to introduce yourself this morning for the tape recorder?

TINA BARNEY: Yes, my name is Tina Barney and I was born in New York City in 1945. And I'm sitting here on Gramercy Park being interviewed by Merry Foresta, who I've known for many years.

Mordi Gassner Oral History Interview Conducted by Estill Curtis Pennington for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1982

Mordi Gassner (b. 1899 d. 1995)

Muralist, Designer, Art Educator, Washington, DC

Interviewer: Estill Curtis Pennington

Interview with Mordi Gassner, conducted by Estill Curtis Pennington for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at the Archives of American Art in Washington, DC, on April 16, 1982. Gassner speaks of growing up in Brooklyn, NY; attending Parsons Design School (then called New York School of Fine and Applied Art); opening a studio and designing signs for the Strand Theater; walking from El Paso, Texas to Phoenix to improve his eye condition; beginning work in Hollywood and working on set designs for Douglas Fairbanks and Cecille DeMille; moving back to New York to teach art in a Big Brother program; creating his mural, Mural Monument to Modern Culture; receiving a Guggenheim Fellowship and spending two years in Florence before returning to New York during the Depression; being invited to work back in Hollywood for Disney Studios and with Ernest Schoedsack only to have the films cancel production; his one-man show at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; his involvement with the Artists' Union and the American Artists' Congress; creating Op art during World War I, and later designing visual aids for the armed services during World War II; becoming the art director of ABC [American Broadcasting Corporation]; working later at the Metropolitan Opera as a scenic painter; moving to Drakes Branch, Virginia after his retirement.

Total: 3 digital files; 1:29:17; 25 pages

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