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Irving Petlin Oral History Interview Conducted by James McElhinney for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2016

JAMES MCELHINNEY:  Good. This is James McElhinney speaking with Irving Petlin at his home in New York, on Tuesday, the 13th of September, 2016, at quarter of 3:00 in the afternoon. The cat's playing with a wire.

IRVING PETLIN:  The cat's playing with—

JAMES MCELHINNEY:  That's—it's—[laughs].

IRVING PETLIN:  Okay.

JAMES MCELHINNEY:  Yeah, the microphone wire.

IRVING PETLIN:  Okay.

Chuck Close Oral History Interview Conducted by Christopher Lyon for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2017

CHRISTOPHER LYON: This is Christopher Lyon, interviewing Chuck Close at his home and studio in Long Beach, New York, on July 20, 2017. Thank you for agreeing to do this. As I mentioned, I have an itinerary of questions, but you should feel free to go on as you will. If something isn't interesting to you, we'll just move on to the next thing, and when you're tired and if you want to stop, that's totally fine.

Doug Aitken Oral History Interview Conducted by Hunter Drohojowska-Philp for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2017

HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP: This is Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, interviewing Doug Aitken at the artist's home at 25 Anchorage [Street], in Marina Del Rey, California, on the 21st of July, 2017, for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, card number one.

Good morning, Doug.

DOUG AITKEN: Good morning, Hunter.

Valerie Jaudon Oral History Interview Conducted by Avis Berman for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2009

AVIS BERMAN:  This is Avis Berman interviewing Valerie Jaudon for the Archives of American Art GSA Oral History Project on October 8, 2009, in her studio in New York City.

I always start the same way with everyone. Would you please state your full name and date of birth?

VALERIE JAUDON:  Valerie Jaudon, August 6, 1945.

AVIS BERMAN:  And you have no middle name?

VALERIE JAUDON:  It was Jean. I haven't used it in—

AVIS BERMAN:  That's all right. And how would that be spelled? With one N or ends in N-E?

VALERIE JAUDON:  J-E-A-N.

Interview with Ilya Bolotowsky

ADELAIDE FREER:  Maybe we could talk about how your style developed first.

ILYA BOLOTOWSKY:  Um-hm. All right. We are recording now. My beginnings were different from that of most of the artists who paint modern nowadays. I went to the National Academy of Design; a very conservative school. It's extremely conservative. All the good students were in the position to the faculty. And so this was a normal thing. Let's see. In other words, when I began to work slightly impressionistically, this was a great rebellion, the fact that I was interested in color while in school.

Jane Hammond Oral History Interview Conducted by Judith Olch Richards for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2012

JUDITH RICHARDS:  This is Judith Richards interviewing Jane Hammond in New York City on Grand Street, in her home studio on April 3rd, 2012, for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, disk one. So, it's a pleasure to be here.

JANE HAMMOND:  Thank you. Me too.

William Ashby McCloy Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1982

ROBERT BROWN:  [00:00:00]—1982, Robert Brown, the interviewer. All right, your childhood, you were born in Baltimore, you were very early taken to Shanghai, China, by your family. This is something your father, in his profession, it had carried him there, around 1913?

Bernard Langlais Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1973

ROBERT BROWN: February 21st, 1973.

BERNARD LANGLAIS: Okay, you just let me know how you want to conduct this and the procedure.

ROBERT BROWN: Okay. I would like to just ask you some rather broad questions and could I begin by just asking if you could describe something of your childhood in Maine. Is there anything, as you talk about your childhood, is there anything that you think maybe led you into eventually becoming an artist? What was it like? What was your childhood filled with mainly?

Victoria Barr Oral History Interview Conducted by Paul Cummings for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1977

PAUL CUMMINGS: It is the 11th of January 1977. It is Paul Cummings to Victoria Barr in his studio on 14th Street in New York City.

I discovered you were born in 1937, but I couldn't find out in what city. So, could you start at the beginning?

VICTORIA BARR: Yes. I was born in 1937 in New York City.

PAUL CUMMINGS: Ah. So you were born in New York?

VICTORIA BARR: Yeah.

PAUL CUMMINGS: Where were your parents living then?

VICTORIA BARR: On Beekman Place.

PAUL CUMMINGS: On Beekman Place?

VICTORIA BARR: Yes.

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