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Rosamond Forbes Pickhardt Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1995

Rosamond Forbes Pickhardt (b. 1908 d. 2004)

Writer, Sherborn, Massachusetts

Interviewer: Robert F. Brown

An interview of Rosamond Forbes Pickhardt conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at Pickhardt's home in Sherborn, Massachusetts, on February 13, 1995. Pickhardt recalls her childhood as the daughter of Edward Waldo Forbes, long-time director of the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University (1909-1944) and Margaret Laighton; her early schooling and early interest in art; her family's 11-month stay in Europe in 1922, with the young Daniel Varney Thompson acting as her father's understudy, and during the time her father studied painting with Alexander Iacovleff in Paris; spending several weeks at the Villa Curonia, near Florence, where many art world figures visited. Pickhardt remembers Paul Sachs who, upon coming to the Fogg, encouraged her to go into museum work; Eric Schroeder, a specialist in Near Eastern art and a life-long friend; Frederick "Ted" Grace, a scholar of classical art who had been groomed by Edward Forbes and Paul Sachs to succeed them as director of the Fogg but who was killed during World War II; Jakob Rosenberg, a German refugee scholar; Deman Ross; Harold Zimmerman with whom she studied drawing; Langdon Warner, a scholar of Asiatic art and one of her father's oldest friends; Kingsley Porter; and Mark Tobey with whom she studied. Pickhardt talks about her third marriage to Carl Pickhardt in 1953 and their life-long ties with the Forbes family.

Total: 3 digital audio files; 1:28:41; 37 pages.

Lillian Orlowsky Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1996

Lillian Orlowsky (b. 1914 d. 2004)

Painter, Provincetown, Massachusetts

Interviewer: Robert F. Brown

Interview of Lillian Orlowsky conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at Orlowsky's home in Provincetown, Massachusetts, on August 5, 1996 and August 26, 1996. Orlowsky talks about her childhood in Manhattan, N.Y., including her interest in modern dance, attending art classes at the Educational Alliance in the Lower East Side where she met classmate Louise Nevelson (1932-33); her studies at the American Artists School with Raphael and Moses Soyer and Anton Refregier; creating watercolors with William Freed; her work in the mural and easel divisions of the WPA; Hans Hofmann's classes and her classmates, including Lee Krasner (1937); her return to Provincetown, Mass., in 1944, with husband William Freed; and Forum 49 in Provincetown. Orlowsky also recalls David Alfaro Siqueiros' method of painting.

Total: 3 digital recordings; 2:12:39; transcribed X pages.

Paul H. Nitze Oral History Interview Conducted by Liza Kirwin and Richard Wattenmaker for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1996

Paul H. Nitze (b. 1907 d. 2004)

Art Dealer, Washington, D.C.

Interviewer: Liza Kirwin and Richard Wattenmaker

 

Interview of Paul H. Nitze, conducted by Liza Kirwin and Richard Wattenmaker for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution at The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of The John Hopkins University, in Washington, D.C., On April 30, 1996. Nitze recalls his acquaintance with Alexander Calder and Isamu Noguchi. He discusses meeting Calder in Berlin, Germany at the opening of a Calder exhibition in 1929; how Calder moved to Nitze's Berlin pension and they "became pals" that first day; their plans to bicycle to Russia with other friends; sharing an apartment with Calder in New York City; a performance of the Circus there and how "everybody loved him"; and Calder's courtship and marriage to Louisa James. Nitze talks about meeting Noguchi through Sydney Spivak and how Noguchi made a bronze head of Nitze as re-payment for his support; and Noguchi's "instinct for making things acceptable to the modern art world." He also discusses his early desire to be an art dealer and pursuing that career in Paris until he realized that "the whole profession was a bunch of crooks"; his own art collection and how, at age 15, he bought two paintings by Austrian Hans Grüss, and later acquired works by Degas, Van Gogh, and Monet.

Total: 1 digital recording; 0:44:33; transcribed 13 pages.

Marston Dean Hodgin Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1998

Marston Dean Hodgin (b. 1903 d. 2003)

Painter, North Truro, Massachusetts

Interviewer: Robert F. Brown

An interview of Marston Dean Hodgin conducted 1998 Aug. 25, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art, in Hodgin's home, North Truro, Mass. The interview covers Hodgin's background and early career up to his trip to Europe in 1931. Hodgin discusses settling in Richmond, Ind., his father's hometown; effect of his father's Quaker beliefs; great effect on him of art exhibitions staged by the Richmond Art Association at the local high school; first formal art lessons with Randolph Coats; freshman year at Indiana University; remaining college years at Earlham College; to Provincetown summer 1924 to study at a school run (for two years) by Indiana painters Coats and James P. Hopkins; to Miami University of Ohio in 1927 as an artist-in-residence; establishing ca. 1928 the School of Fine Arts at Miami University; marriage to childhood sweetheart, Lucy Loufborrow in 1929; summer 1931 trip to Europe to familiarize himself with leading art museums; his comprehensive definition of art as encompassing the visual arts, music and dance; and comparisons between painting and poetry.

Total: 2 digital recordings; 1:00:38; transcribed 27 pages.

Wolf Kahn Oral History Interview Conducted by Paul Cummings for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1977

PAUL CUMMINGS:  Today is the 28th of November, 1977, Paul Cummings talking to Wolf Kahn in his studio, 813 Broadway, where you've been for 20 years?

WOLF KAHN:  Twenty-seven.

PAUL CUMMINGS:  Twenty-seven years now?

WOLF KAHN:  Twenty-six, 26. I'm a beacon of stability in a world of change.

PAUL CUMMINGS:  [Laughs.] At least you don't have to worry about where you're going to go.

[Cross talk.]

WOLF KAHN:  You know, I've been—at least 10 times, I've been threatened to be thrown out.

PAUL CUMMINGS:  Really?

Henry Strater Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1973

ROBERT F. BROWN:  This is reel 1 of 1, Side A. I didn't think that I was very clear on my—in the conversational tone.

HENRY STRATER:  Uh, I was pleasantly surprised rereading that original recording.

ROBERT F. BROWN:  Okay. [Audio break.] This is a second interview with Henry Strater at Ogunquit, ME, and this is September 28, 1973. Uh, Mr. Strater, I think you wanted to say something about your having gone over that—the first interview we did, and explain, uh, something to people about that. And then we'll get into additional things that we wanted to do today.

John Spencer Oral History Interview Conducted by Paul Karlstrom for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1994

John Spencer (b.

Painter, Pasadena, California

Interviewer: Paul J. Karlstrom

Interview with John Spencer, conducted by Paul J. Karlstrom for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at Spencer's home in Pasadena, California on September 1, 1994. Spencer discusses his work assisting Dean Cornwell on the Los Angeles Central Library murals between 1927-1933; his subsequent relationship with Cornwell; and his experience as a young artist in Southern California in the 1930s.

Total: 3 digital recordings; 1:23:10; transcribed 40 pages.

Helen Marjorie Windust Halper Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1994

Helen Marjorie Windust Halper (b. 1908 d. 1996)

Painter, Provincetown, Massachusetts

Interviewer: Robert F. Brown

Interview with Helen Marjorie Windust Halper, conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at Halper's home in Provincetown, Massachusetts on September 27, 1994. Halper talks about her mother and father; childhood summers spent on the northwestern French coast where she got to know Max Bohm and his family; being in France during World War I; and time spent living in England. She discusses going to New York, in 1920, with her brother, and attending the Veltin School for Girls and the Dalton School; going to Provincetown, in 1925, with her mother; and Charles Hawthorne and his teaching methods. She tells about studying color and abstraction with Vaclav Vytlacil at the Art Students League; drawing classes with Thomas Hart Benton; and extreme poverty of Edwin Dickinson and other Provincetown artists. She recounts meeting Nathan Halper in the 1930s and their marriage following World War II, his becoming an art dealer; and the success of his H.C. and H.C.E. Gallery during the 1950s and 1960s. Halper recalls several Provincetown artists, among them Frederick Waugh, Philip Malicoat, and Hans Hofmann.

Total: 2 digital recordings; 1:28:53; transcribed 28 pages.

Walter Feldman Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1998

Walter Feldman (b.1925 d. 2017)

Artist and Art Educator, Providence, Rhode Island

Interviewer: Robert F. Brown

Interview of Walter Feldman conducted by Robert Brown for the the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, in Feldman's home in Providence, R.I. on August 10, 1998. Feldman discusses attending classes as a youth, 1939-1942, at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; attending Yale's School of Fine Arts, 1942; service in combat infantry in the U.S. Army, Europe, 1943-1946; completing his BFA at Yale, 1946-1950 and MFA, 1951; working as an instructor in painting at Yale until his appointment at Brown University (1953; professor 1961) where he taught; exhibitions and commissions; working in painting, printmaking, mosaics, and in fine book making. He discusses working as the sole studio art teacher at Brown University until mid-1960s; hiring of additional artist-teachers and the subsequent split of the art department between studio art and art history; bringing book arts to Brown with his establishment of the Brown/Ziggurat Press, which he directed and which mostly publishes poetry; the many visiting artists at Brown; frequent commissions which kept him young in spirit; and working in widely divergent media: medals, mosaics, and a huge mural commission in 1976; discussion of leading examples of his handmade books, including James Schevill's poetry, "Lager Lieder" (1991), a book of concentration camp songs, and Michael Harper's "Family Sequences" (1998); broadsides he's designed, sculptural "reliqueries" to memorialize the Jewish Holocaust; the prospering of his artists books; and his success as a teacher.

Total: 2 digital recordings; 0:59:02; transcribed 29 pages.

Kent Ipsen Oral History Interview Conducted by Josephine Shea for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2009

JOSEPHINE SHEA: Okay, I think we're ready to begin here.

I'm sitting in the studio of Kent Ipsen. And this is Josephine Shea interviewing Kent Forrest Ipsen, I believe it is, at the artist's studio in Richmond, Virginia on the 4th of July, 2009 for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. And this is disc number one.

The way that we usually begin is at the beginning, which is when and where were you born?

KENT IPSEN: Well, I was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

JOSEPHINE SHEA: Okay.

KENT IPSEN: Would you like to know what year?

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