Collections

Gain access to archival collections, images, interviews, audiovisual records, and digitized collections.

William Ashby McCloy Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1982

ROBERT BROWN:  [00:00:00]—1982, Robert Brown, the interviewer. All right, your childhood, you were born in Baltimore, you were very early taken to Shanghai, China, by your family. This is something your father, in his profession, it had carried him there, around 1913?

Bernard Langlais Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1973

ROBERT BROWN: February 21st, 1973.

BERNARD LANGLAIS: Okay, you just let me know how you want to conduct this and the procedure.

ROBERT BROWN: Okay. I would like to just ask you some rather broad questions and could I begin by just asking if you could describe something of your childhood in Maine. Is there anything, as you talk about your childhood, is there anything that you think maybe led you into eventually becoming an artist? What was it like? What was your childhood filled with mainly?

Victoria Barr Oral History Interview Conducted by Paul Cummings for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1977

PAUL CUMMINGS: It is the 11th of January 1977. It is Paul Cummings to Victoria Barr in his studio on 14th Street in New York City.

I discovered you were born in 1937, but I couldn't find out in what city. So, could you start at the beginning?

VICTORIA BARR: Yes. I was born in 1937 in New York City.

PAUL CUMMINGS: Ah. So you were born in New York?

VICTORIA BARR: Yeah.

PAUL CUMMINGS: Where were your parents living then?

VICTORIA BARR: On Beekman Place.

PAUL CUMMINGS: On Beekman Place?

VICTORIA BARR: Yes.

Otto Piene Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1988

August 16, 1988

 

ROBERT BROWN:  [00:00:00] Otto Piene of MIT. Robert Brown, the interviewer. I'd like to begin with your talking perhaps a bit about childhood and early memories, and particularly those that may have led to what you eventually did. I know you went on several tracks as a young man, in your education. What do you recall of early childhood? You've mentioned, um, wartime, I know, in past accounts.

 

Fleur Bresler Oral History Interview Conducted by Glenn Adamson for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2018

GLENN ADAMSON:  Testing, testing. One, two, three. Testing, testing. One, two, three. This is Glenn Adamson interviewing Fleur Bresler at the collector's home in—well, near Washington D.C., just outside in Maryland. Is it Rockville, Maryland, Fleur?

FLEUR BRESLER:  Yes.

GLENN ADAMSON:  On the 19th of April [2018] for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, and the Frick Art Reference Library of the Frick Collection. And this is card number one of the interview. Fleur, thanks so much for having me here to your home.

FLEUR BRESLER:  My pleasure.

Kiki Smith Oral History Interview Conducted by Christopher Lyon for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2017

KIKI SMITH:  After menopause, I just didn't have the same—I don't have the same sort of manic need to be making something every second of the day. And then also, I know the forms of making things often, and I know the forms of exhibiting something, or the distribution of it, and then I have to relearn or find some crevice of something that I've missed, to find a new way to, you know, be excited about what I'm doing. You know, I've been working a long time, so I've had a lot of experiences that for the most part have been very good. Also, I got married recently.

Barbara Hammer Interview Conducted by Svetlana Kitto for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2018

SVETLANA KITTO:  This is Svetlana Kitto, interviewing Barbara Hammer at her partner's home in the West Village in New York, NY, on March 15, 2018, for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, card number one. So if you could just start by telling me where and when you were born and a little bit about your early life.

Richard Haas Interview Conducted by Avis Berman for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2009

AVIS BERMAN:  This is Avis Berman interviewing Richard Haas for the GSA [General Services Administration], Archives of American Art Oral History Project, on January 13, 2009, in his studio on West 36th Street.

Would you please state your full name and date of birth?

RICHARD HAAS:  Richard John Haas. Born August 29, 1936, in Spring Green, Wisconsin.

Louise Nevelson Oral History Interview Conducted by Dorothy Gees Seckler for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1964

This is tape number one of five side A.

DOROTHY GEES SECKLER:  [00:00:00] This is—this is Dorothy Seckler introducing an interview with Louise Nevelson. Took place in June 1964. Miss Nevelson is speaking.

[Audio break.]

LOUISE NEVELSON:  I was going to say that I think that you're asking me another question about, uh—when did I know that I was going to be an artist—

DOROTHY GEES SECKLER:  Yes, yes.

Joe Schwartz Oral History Interview Conducted by Paul Gardullo and James Miller for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2010

PAUL GARDULLO: When did you buy this house?

JOE SCHWARTZ: When?

PAUL GARDULLO:  Yes.

JOE SCHWARTZ:  Oh, you're going to make my brains work. Let's see. 19[88 –PM]—I've got to think of events. There was this political upheaval going on. And I decided to leave—finally to seek my dream kind of thing, which I was in a farm area where there was the ecology—trees and beautiful things and all that. And I'm trying to think of the—

PAUL GARDULLO:  1980s? 1985?

JOE SCHWARTZ:  I do have a receipt, I guess. It tells when. But I didn't prepare for it.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Collections