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Mindy Weisel Oral History Interview Conducted by Anne Louise Bayly Berman for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2001

Mindy Weisel (b.)

Painter, Washington, DC

Interviewer: Anne Louise Bayly Berman

Interview with Mindy Weisel, conducted by Anne Louise Bayly Berman for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at the artist's studio in Washington, DC, on September 21, 2001 and November 1, 2001. Weisel speaks of her parents and their surviving the Holocaust; her mother showing her beauty as a child; being the daughter of survivors; wanting to draw as a child; studying art in college; her marriage and motherhood; balancing the role of wife, mother and artist; September 11th; her Ella Fitzgerald series; her time at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts; process of working; creating Lily Let’s Dance and It’s Ok Kid; writing her books "Daughters of Absence", "Touching Quiet", "The Rainbow Diet"; art and survival.

 

Total: X digital files; TIME; X pages

Alexander Giampietro and Hubert Leckie Oral History Interview Conducted by Liza Kiriwn for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1992

An interview with Hubert Leckie and Alexander Giampietro conducted February 13, 1992, by Liza Kirwin, for the Archives of American Art. Leckie and Giampietro recall their student days at the New Bauhaus in Chicago (fall 1937- summer 1938) and the teaching methods of Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Alexander Archipenko, Hin Bredendieck, Gyorgy Kepes, David Dushkin, and others there; the New Bauhaus approach to design; the closing of the school in 1938 and its reincarnation in the Institute of Design; Leckie's application of New Bauhaus principles in his teaching at American University and the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) in Washington, D.C.; ICA exhibitions and programs; both teaching at the ICA from 1948 to 1951; their impressions of ICA director Robert Richman; the impact of the ICA on the Washington, D.C. art scene; and the exchange between the ICA, American University, the Washington Workshop Center for the Arts, Catholic University, and other schools. Leckie also discusses his role as the designer of the Archives of American Art Journal.

Bettina Brendel Oral History Interview Conducted by Paul Karlstrom for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2001

PAUL KARLSTROM: Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, an interview with the artist, Bettina Brendel, at her studio on Kenter Avenue in Los Angeles. This is called Kenter Canyon, I do believe.

BETTINA BRENDEL: Yes.

PAUL KARLSTROM: The interviewer is Paul Karlstrom. The date is August 23, 2001. This is tape one, side A. Now, Bettina, here we finally are, doing this wonderful interview. We are going to have fun. We have known one another for, actually, quite a few years. You have been a good supporter and friend of the arts.

BETTINA BRENDEL: Oh, yes.

Hugh Mesibov Oral History Interview Conducted by James McElhinney for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2012

Hugh Mesibov (b. 1916 d. 2016)

Painter and Printmaker, Chestnut Ridge, New York

Interviewer: James McElhinney

Interview with Hugh Mesibov, conducted by James McElhinney for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at the artist's home in Chesnut Ridge, New York, on December 4, 2012. Mesibov speaks of growing up in Philadelphia; working as a shipfitter at Cramp's Shipyard; his time working with the graphic arts division of the WPA and creating a new print process called the carborundum print with artists Dox Thrash and Michael Gallagher; painting canvases and mural for the WPA; his time at the Pennsylvania Academy of Art; his relationship with Dr. Albert C. Barnes of the Barnes Foundation and Barnes Collection; gatherings at "The Heel" on South Broad Street in Philadelphia, which was part of Horn and Hodart; painting murals The Book of Job and Byzantine Figure; his relationship with art collector David Orr. He recalls moving to New York City in the 1940s and becoming a member of "The Club" with other Abstract Expressionists like David Kline and Ibram Lassaw; exhibiting his work at the Sragow Gallery, the Susan Teller Gallery, the Woodmere Art Gallery, and the Chinese Gallery; his time spent in Aspen, Colorado, where he was exposed to poets and nature that influenced his work; working as an art teacher at the Wiltwyck School in Esopus, New York; working as an art therapist with Judith Kramer at the Lenox Hill House in New York City; moving to Rockland County, New York in the 1960s with his family; teaching at Rockland Community College; his friendships with other artists in the area such as Khoren Der Harootian, Vaclav Vytlacil, Richard Pousette-Dart, and Maurice Prendergast. Mesibov is joined in the interview by his wife, Eudice Charney Meisbov, and his daughter, Deborah Mesibov. Chelsea Cooksey assists James McElhinney with the recording.

Total: 4 digital files; 3:25:37; 80 pages

James S. Ackerman Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1991

James S. Ackerman (b.1919 d. 2016)

Art Historian, Fogg Museum of Art, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Interviewer: Robert F. Brown

Interview with James S. Ackerman, conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at the Fogg Museum of Art in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on January 2, 1991. Ackerman speaks of his childhood in San Francisco in a wealthy family of German-Jewish descent; travels with his family in Europe; early exposure to art and art history; education at the Cate School, California; education at Yale University, 1938-41, including recollections of teachers and curriculum, especially the charismatic teaching of Henri Focillon; graduate work at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, 1941 and 1945-52, including curriculum and teachers such as Karl Lehmann, Richard Krautheimer, and Erwin Panofsky; World War II experience in signal intelligence; early publications and their fortunate effect on his career, and contrast of those who solely pursued facts and those who also have ideas.

Total: 3 digital files; 1:47:38; 20 pages

Interview with Romare Bearden

Tape 1, side A

AVIS BERMAN:  How did you get your name? Romare - it's such a beautiful name.

ROMARE BEARDEN:  Well, this [gesturing to photographs] is my great-grandfather and my great-grandmother, and in answering your question, he had a friend from Joplin, Missouri, named Mr. Fred Romare, and so they named me after him. (he pronounces it ROAM-a-ree)

AVIS BERMAN:  It's very musical-sounding. It's so interesting. I just want to check on your schedule. Now when do you leave for the West Indies?

ROMARE BEARDEN:  On the sixth.

AVIS BERMAN:  Sixth.

Thomas Lawson Oral History Interview Conducted by Russell Ferguson for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2018

RUSSELL FERGUSON:  Okay, this is Russell Ferguson. I'm Russell Ferguson with Tom Lawson. Tom will be the next voice you hear after mine. And it's August 9, 2018. This is our oral history interview for the Archives of American Art.

THOMAS LAWSON:  And we're in Los Angeles.

Bernard Chaet Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1997

ROBERT BROWN:  ­­—nterviewing Bernard Chaet at his house in Rockport, Massachusetts, June—

BERNARD CHAET:  18.

ROBERT BROWN:  —18, 1997. All right. Let's just see how—perhaps you could talk a bit about some of your early memories, your family background.

BERNARD CHAET:  Mm-hmm [affirmative].

ROBERT BROWN:  You were born in Boston.

BERNARD CHAET:  Boston, nineteen hundred and 24 [1924].

ROBERT BROWN:  Mm-hmm [affirmative].

Judy Fiskin Oral History Interview Conducted by Hunter Drohojowska-Philp for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2009

HUNTER DROHOJOWKSA-PHILP: This is Hunter Drohojowska-Philp interviewing Judy Fiskin at the artist's home in West Los Angeles on November 13 in the afternoon for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, disc one.

Judy, let's begin at the beginning. When you were born and where were you brought up?

JUDY FISKIN: I was born in 1945. I lived the first 18 months of my life in Chicago and then my parents moved to Los Angeles.

HUNTER DROHOJOWKSA-PHILP: Now, what did your parents do?

May Stevens Oral History Interview Conducted by Judith O. Richards for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2009

JUDITH O. RICHARDS:  This is Judith Richards interviewing May Stevens on August 10, 2009, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, disc number one.

It's a pleasure to be here, May.

MAY STEVENS: Mm-hmm. [Affirmative.]

JUDITH O. RICHARDS:  And I wanted to start from the very beginning and ask you to speak about your parents and even your grandparents as much as you wish, their background, and then come to when you were born, the time you were born.

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