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Barbara Fleischman Oral History Interview Conducted by Avis Berman for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2011

AVIS BERMAN:  This is Avis Berman interviewing Barbara G. Fleischman for the Archives of American Art Oral History Program on December 27, 2011, in her home in New York City.

I start this way with everyone. Would you please state your full name and date of birth?

BARBARA FLEISCHMAN:  Barbara G. Fleischman, March 20, 1924.

AVIS BERMAN:  Okay, and the G is for—

BARBARA FLEISCHMAN:  Greenberg. That was my maiden name.

AVIS BERMAN:  Yes, did you have a middle name?

BARBARA FLEISCHMAN:  Ann.

AVIS BERMAN:  Without an E?

Neil Williams Oral History Interview Conducted by Mija Riedel for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2014

MIJA RIEDEL: This is Mija Riedel with Neil Williams in the artist's home and studio in Auburn, CA on June 5, 2014 for the Smithsonian Archives of American Art, card number one. So let's start with—a description of this fantastic place that you have. It dates back to 1937, is that right?

NEIL WILLIAMS: I believe '37 or '38—

MIJA RIEDEL: Mm-hmm. [Affirmative.]

Hans J. Barschel Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1994

Hans Joachim Barschel (b.1912 d.1998)

Graphic designer and arts instructor, Rochester, New York

Interviewer: Robert F. Brown

Interview of Hans Joachim Barschel by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at Barschel’s home in Rochester, New York on September 14, 1994. Barschel discusses his childhood during World War I and the 1920s in two Berlin suburbs, Charlottenburg and Pankow, as the son of a civil engineer and his wife, whose father was a factory foreman; the contrast of the ludicrous militarism of the late Wilhelmine Germany with the straightened but liberalized circumstances of life in the Weimar Republic which followed; and his first acquaintance with foreign cultures during a 1929 excursion with his free-spirited aunt and uncle. He remembers the enlightened teaching and loose curricula he experienced during 1930-35 in advertising design study with George Salter at the Municipal Art School, Berlin, and then in graduate studies in design, painting, printmaking, and photography at the Academy of Fine and Applied Arts, Berlin-Charlottenburg. He talks about his disgust at the onset of Naziism; his brief career (1935-37) in Berlin as a free-lance graphic designer and as head graphic designer for the Reichsbahn; his getting his beloved teacher, George Salter, a Jew, out of Nazi Germany; his emigration in 1937 using forged documents and his rapid establishment as a designer in New York thanks to his friendship with Dr. Robert Leslie of The Composing Room. He discusses advertisements, posters, and book jackets designed for American publications and companies and (1948) for the United Nations; his move to Rochester, New York, in 1952, as a designer for printing companies and beginning the teaching of design at the Rochester Institute of Technology at the invitation of Stanley Witmeyer, Director of its School of Art and Design; fellow teachers at RIT, including the ceramists, Hobart Cowles and Frans Wildenhain; and the importance of continually refreshing the creative powers by sketching in nature, a principle instilled in him as a student which he carried into his teaching at RIT.

Total: 3 digital recordings; 2:01:25; 50 pages.

Rosamond Forbes Pickhardt Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1995

Rosamond Forbes Pickhardt (b. 1908 d. 2004)

Writer, Sherborn, Massachusetts

Interviewer: Robert F. Brown

An interview of Rosamond Forbes Pickhardt conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at Pickhardt's home in Sherborn, Massachusetts, on February 13, 1995. Pickhardt recalls her childhood as the daughter of Edward Waldo Forbes, long-time director of the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University (1909-1944) and Margaret Laighton; her early schooling and early interest in art; her family's 11-month stay in Europe in 1922, with the young Daniel Varney Thompson acting as her father's understudy, and during the time her father studied painting with Alexander Iacovleff in Paris; spending several weeks at the Villa Curonia, near Florence, where many art world figures visited. Pickhardt remembers Paul Sachs who, upon coming to the Fogg, encouraged her to go into museum work; Eric Schroeder, a specialist in Near Eastern art and a life-long friend; Frederick "Ted" Grace, a scholar of classical art who had been groomed by Edward Forbes and Paul Sachs to succeed them as director of the Fogg but who was killed during World War II; Jakob Rosenberg, a German refugee scholar; Deman Ross; Harold Zimmerman with whom she studied drawing; Langdon Warner, a scholar of Asiatic art and one of her father's oldest friends; Kingsley Porter; and Mark Tobey with whom she studied. Pickhardt talks about her third marriage to Carl Pickhardt in 1953 and their life-long ties with the Forbes family.

Total: 3 digital audio files; 1:28:41; 37 pages.

Lillian Orlowsky Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1996

Lillian Orlowsky (b. 1914 d. 2004)

Painter, Provincetown, Massachusetts

Interviewer: Robert F. Brown

Interview of Lillian Orlowsky conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at Orlowsky's home in Provincetown, Massachusetts, on August 5, 1996 and August 26, 1996. Orlowsky talks about her childhood in Manhattan, N.Y., including her interest in modern dance, attending art classes at the Educational Alliance in the Lower East Side where she met classmate Louise Nevelson (1932-33); her studies at the American Artists School with Raphael and Moses Soyer and Anton Refregier; creating watercolors with William Freed; her work in the mural and easel divisions of the WPA; Hans Hofmann's classes and her classmates, including Lee Krasner (1937); her return to Provincetown, Mass., in 1944, with husband William Freed; and Forum 49 in Provincetown. Orlowsky also recalls David Alfaro Siqueiros' method of painting.

Total: 3 digital recordings; 2:12:39; transcribed X pages.

Paul H. Nitze Oral History Interview Conducted by Liza Kirwin and Richard Wattenmaker for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1996

Paul H. Nitze (b. 1907 d. 2004)

Art Dealer, Washington, D.C.

Interviewer: Liza Kirwin and Richard Wattenmaker

 

Interview of Paul H. Nitze, conducted by Liza Kirwin and Richard Wattenmaker for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution at The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of The John Hopkins University, in Washington, D.C., On April 30, 1996. Nitze recalls his acquaintance with Alexander Calder and Isamu Noguchi. He discusses meeting Calder in Berlin, Germany at the opening of a Calder exhibition in 1929; how Calder moved to Nitze's Berlin pension and they "became pals" that first day; their plans to bicycle to Russia with other friends; sharing an apartment with Calder in New York City; a performance of the Circus there and how "everybody loved him"; and Calder's courtship and marriage to Louisa James. Nitze talks about meeting Noguchi through Sydney Spivak and how Noguchi made a bronze head of Nitze as re-payment for his support; and Noguchi's "instinct for making things acceptable to the modern art world." He also discusses his early desire to be an art dealer and pursuing that career in Paris until he realized that "the whole profession was a bunch of crooks"; his own art collection and how, at age 15, he bought two paintings by Austrian Hans Grüss, and later acquired works by Degas, Van Gogh, and Monet.

Total: 1 digital recording; 0:44:33; transcribed 13 pages.

Marston Dean Hodgin Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1998

Marston Dean Hodgin (b. 1903 d. 2003)

Painter, North Truro, Massachusetts

Interviewer: Robert F. Brown

An interview of Marston Dean Hodgin conducted 1998 Aug. 25, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art, in Hodgin's home, North Truro, Mass. The interview covers Hodgin's background and early career up to his trip to Europe in 1931. Hodgin discusses settling in Richmond, Ind., his father's hometown; effect of his father's Quaker beliefs; great effect on him of art exhibitions staged by the Richmond Art Association at the local high school; first formal art lessons with Randolph Coats; freshman year at Indiana University; remaining college years at Earlham College; to Provincetown summer 1924 to study at a school run (for two years) by Indiana painters Coats and James P. Hopkins; to Miami University of Ohio in 1927 as an artist-in-residence; establishing ca. 1928 the School of Fine Arts at Miami University; marriage to childhood sweetheart, Lucy Loufborrow in 1929; summer 1931 trip to Europe to familiarize himself with leading art museums; his comprehensive definition of art as encompassing the visual arts, music and dance; and comparisons between painting and poetry.

Total: 2 digital recordings; 1:00:38; transcribed 27 pages.

Wolf Kahn Oral History Interview Conducted by Paul Cummings for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1977

PAUL CUMMINGS:  Today is the 28th of November, 1977, Paul Cummings talking to Wolf Kahn in his studio, 813 Broadway, where you've been for 20 years?

WOLF KAHN:  Twenty-seven.

PAUL CUMMINGS:  Twenty-seven years now?

WOLF KAHN:  Twenty-six, 26. I'm a beacon of stability in a world of change.

PAUL CUMMINGS:  [Laughs.] At least you don't have to worry about where you're going to go.

[Cross talk.]

WOLF KAHN:  You know, I've been—at least 10 times, I've been threatened to be thrown out.

PAUL CUMMINGS:  Really?

Henry Strater Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1973

ROBERT F. BROWN:  This is reel 1 of 1, Side A. I didn't think that I was very clear on my—in the conversational tone.

HENRY STRATER:  Uh, I was pleasantly surprised rereading that original recording.

ROBERT F. BROWN:  Okay. [Audio break.] This is a second interview with Henry Strater at Ogunquit, ME, and this is September 28, 1973. Uh, Mr. Strater, I think you wanted to say something about your having gone over that—the first interview we did, and explain, uh, something to people about that. And then we'll get into additional things that we wanted to do today.

John Spencer Oral History Interview Conducted by Paul Karlstrom for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1994

John Spencer (b.

Painter, Pasadena, California

Interviewer: Paul J. Karlstrom

Interview with John Spencer, conducted by Paul J. Karlstrom for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at Spencer's home in Pasadena, California on September 1, 1994. Spencer discusses his work assisting Dean Cornwell on the Los Angeles Central Library murals between 1927-1933; his subsequent relationship with Cornwell; and his experience as a young artist in Southern California in the 1930s.

Total: 3 digital recordings; 1:23:10; transcribed 40 pages.

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