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Dennis Adrian Oral History Interview Conducted by Lanny Silverman for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2015

LANNY SILVERMAN:  Okay, I guess the obvious place to start is I'm kind of curious Dennis—you're out here in the—near the Portland area, in the West Coast. Is this where you're from? And where were you—

DENNIS ADRIAN:  Well, I was born around here, at the little town of Astoria. It's at the mouth of the Colombia [River –DA]. And as a child, I always liked the beach better than the river, and whenever I could get to the seaside, I—sometimes, one has a sense of, "This is my place."

LANNY SILVERMAN:  Oh, yeah.

Lewis Iselin Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1981

LEWIS ISELIN:  —have a show at the [inaudible]—

[Audio break.]

ROBERT F. BROWN:  This is an interview with Lewis Iselin in Camden, Maine, September 30, 1981, Robert Brown, the interviewer. When you were last interviewed by us in 1969, and one of the things you discussed at great length in that previous interview was your involvement as a, with various foundations that worked with the arts. For example, one was the Guggenheim Foundation, which you continued into the 1970s.

Tony Vevers Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1998

[Reel 1, Side A.]

TONY VEVERS:  —creation of the work site, so—which was a zoo in the country, one of the first open zoos where animals were kept in large sort of paddocks or enclosures like the wild. And as near to the natural habitat as possible. So I sort of grew up in the zoo. And close to nature, because I spent all my early life in the, out in the country in Bedfordshire near the Whipsnade Zoo. And uh––

ROBERT BROWN:  And that was an innovation completely was it, Whipsnade?

TONY VEVERS:  Well, it was—

Tom Jancar Oral History Interview Conducted by Hunter Drohojowska-Philp for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2017

HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP:  Tom Jancar. It's good to get together with you here in Claremont, and this is Hunter Drohojowska-Philp interviewing Tom Jancar at an office, really a studio space, lent to us by Claremont College.

TOM JANCAR:  Pomona College.

HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP:  I mean Pomona College, sorry. The art department of Pomona College, in—

TOM JANCAR:  Claremont, California.

Martha Wilson Oral History Interview Conducted by Liza Zapol for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2017

LIZA ZAPOL:  Okay, so this is Liza Zapol for the Archives of American Art, [Smithsonian Institution] oral history program. It's May 17, 2017. And if I can ask you to introduce yourself, please?

MARTHA WILSON:  My name is Martha Wilson, and I'm going to not hold anything back.

LIZA ZAPOL:  Thank you. And we're here at your home in Brooklyn. So, if I can just ask you to begin at the beginning—

MARTHA WILSON:  Okay.

LIZA ZAPOL:  —as I said.

MARTHA WILSON:  Okay.

Alexander Stoller Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1976

ALEXANDER STOLLER:  Uh, the easiest thing at that time—

[Audio break.]

ROBERT F. BROWN:  December 10, 1976. [Audio break.] This is December 10, 1976, an interview in West Stockbridge, Massachusetts. Right?

ALEXANDER STOLLER:  Yes.

ROBERT F. BROWN:  With Alexander Stoller. And to begin, you've been talking a bit about what it was like as a child, at the time you grew up. You were born in New York City in—

ALEXANDER STOLLER:  —New York City.

ROBERT F. BROWN:  [1902].

Vincent Andrew Hartgen Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1981

ROBERT F. BROWN:  Hello? Hello? [Audio break.]

VINCENT ANDREW HARTGEN:  I would—haven't any idea what we're going to talk about.

ROBERT F. BROWN:  October 1, 1981. Mr. Hartgen, I'd like to follow roughly an outline of significant or important things in your life, but not neglecting just to discuss the commonplace when that may shed light on why you later did things. For example, you were born in Reading, PA. Was your family one that was at all interested in the arts? How did you eventually—when would you say you first developed an interest in that direction?

Jeanne L. Wasserman Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1993

ROBERT F. BROWN:  [00:00:00] Interview with Jeanne Wasserman, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

[Audio break.]

ROBERT F. BROWN:  If our voices are picking up as they should, let's see, if you just say—well, this is January 28th, isn't it?

JEANNE L. WASSERMAN:  This is the 28th of January, yes.

[Audio break.]

JEANNE L. WASSERMAN:  —starting.

[Audio break.]

ROBERT F. BROWN:  I'd like to just begin by asking you questions about your childhood. You were raised in New York or near New York?

Bill Jacobson Oral History Interview Conducted by Alex Fialho for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, [Year]

ALEX FIALHO: This is Alex Fialho interviewing Bill Jacobson at his home and studio in Brooklyn, New York, for the Smithsonian Archives of American Art, Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic Oral History Project, on March 25, 2017. So, Bill, thank you for being involved in the project. If we can start at the beginning, where and when were you born? And tell me a little about your childhood.

Henry Strater Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1971

ROBERT BROWN:  This is October 8, 1971, an interview with Henry Strater at Ogunquit, ME, Robert Brown, the interviewer.  Well, first I'd like, if you would, to say something perhaps of your childhood, anything particularly that you think might have led to your career in art. But almost anything in general.

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