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Harold Tovish Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1974

HAROLD TOVISH: Okay, let's have a—let's hear how that sounds.

ROBERT BROWN:  Right.

HAROLD TOVISH:  Okay, let's hear how that sounds. [Audio break.]

ROBERT BROWN:  Second interview of June 24, 1974. Now, you have been talking last about teaching, and, you know, we could begin today asking you about your teaching. When did you begin teaching? Right after you, uh, had been to Paris?

Oral History Interview with Edna Lindemann Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1994

Edna Lindemann (b. 1915 d. 2006)

Art Teacher, West Falls, New York

Interviewer: Robert F. Brown

Interview of Edna Lindemann, conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at West Falls, on December 1, 1994. Lindemann discusses her childhood in Buffalo as the daughter of Nason and Carl Meibohm, who established an art gallery, frame shop, and art supply store early in the 20th century. She remembers living above the shop and summers spent in the country in the house that is now her residence. She talks about the effect of growing up surrounded by Stickley furniture, leaded glass, and Roycroft objects and the importance of the family's church, the conservative Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod. Lindemann remembers her love of school, although there was no art instruction until high school where she was strongly influenced by Marie Colburn, a serious painter who summered in the art colony of Rockport, Massachusetts She recalls the encouragement of both Colburn and of Henry Jacobs, supervisor of art instruction in the Buffalo public schools, to pursue her art interests. Lindemann recalls the necessity during the Depression of combining technical instruction at the Albright Art School (diploma, 1936) with vocational training in art education at the State University of New York at Buffalo (B.S., 1936). She talks about her early teaching positions in local public schools.

Total: 3 digital files; 1:21:00; 33 pages

Robert Noel Blair Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1994-95

Robert Noel Blair (b.1912 d. 2003)

Painter, Educator, Printmaker; Holland, New York

Interviewer: Robert F. Brown

Interview of Robert Noel Blair, conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at the artist's home in Holland, New York, on November 30, 1994 and August, 27 1995. Blair talks about his father, a Vermonter, who went to Harvard Law School and became a corporation lawyer in Buffalo, and his mother, a Rochester, New York native, who went to Cornell and taught Greek and Latin in New York State schools before marriage; being an indifferent student until he went to the Albright Art School in Buffalo, although instruction there was perfunctory; attending the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (1931-1934), recalling especially his two British drawing teachers, Guthrie and Burns, and Frederick Allen who taught sculpture, and fellow student, Carl Johnson, summers with his family in Vermont and the pleasant primitive farm life; his first teaching job -- Saturday children's classes at the Buffalo Museum of Science and his first exhibitions in Buffalo and New York City, including a show at the Morton Gallery, New York (1940) from which the Metropolitan Museum purchased a large watercolor; his love of using unusual implements to paint with; his service in World War II, in which he was assigned to design training aids and to paint war scenes. Blair continues discussion of his service as an airborne soldier and artist in Belgium and Germany during World War II; returning from the War to direct the Arts Institute of Buffalo and his long friendship with Charles Burchfield; Philip Elliott, painter and teacher at the rival Albright Art School in Buffalo; traveling throughout the US and Mexico, painting wherever he camped; his work and proficiency in watercolor; and the value of figure studies, which he does regularly with other artists.

Total: 4 digital files; 2:29:47; 66 pages

Carlyle H. Smith Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1994

Carlyle H. Smith (b. 1912 d. 2004)

Metal worker; jeweler; silversmith; and educator, Boston, Massachusetts

Interviewer: Robert F. Brown

Interview of Carlyle H. Smith conducted by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at the AAA's regional office in Boston, Massachusetts on August 8, 1994. Smith discusses his childhood in Torrington, Connecticut, his early interest in jewelry design, education at the Rhode Island School of Design in jewelry making and silversmithing, and teaching at the Rhode Island College of Education. He recalls working in the metal craft shop of Augustus Rose on jewelry design and repair, and studying with English master silversmith, William Bennett, at his workshop in 1947. Smith speaks of teaching metal arts in the Providence, R.I., public schools and setting up the first American university-level metal arts curriculum at the University of Kansas, 1947-1977. He describes his liberal approach to teaching by setting general assignments and working alongside students. He comments on his work, 1930-1993.

Total: 3 digital audio files; 1:46:00; 59 pages.

Lewis W. Rubenstein and Erica Beckh Rubenstein Oral History Interview Conducted by Stephen Polcari for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1993

Lewis W. Rubenstein (b. 1908 d. 2003)

Painter, Printmaker, and Educator, Poughkeepsie, New York

Interview of Lewis and Erica Rubenstein conducted by Stephen Polcari for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution at the artist's home in Poughkeepsie, New York, on February 23, 1993. Lewis Rubenstein discusses his early career as a fresco painter, including his training in Italy and friendship with Rico Lebrun. He talks specifically about commissioned murals at the Fogg Art Museum, the Busch-Reisinger Museum, and assisting Jose Clemente Orozco on "portable murals" for the Museum of Modern Art. He talks of his move away from realism and the themes that interested him in the 1950s and 1960s. He remembers spending summers in Provincetown and taking classes with Hans Hofmann, his work teaching studio art at Vassar College, and briefly about the visiting artists program he ran there. Erica Rubenstein talks about the significance of 1930s mural paintings, the WPA movement, and government support of the arts in general.

Total: 3 digital audio files; 1:46:00; transcribed 50 pages.

Albert Landa Interview Conducted by Stephen Polcari and Martica Sawin for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1998

Albert Landa (b. 1927 d. 2008)

Arts Administrator, New York City

Interviewers: Stephen Polcari and Martica Sawin

An interview of Albert Landa conducted by Stephen Polcari and Martica Sawin  for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at the AAA's regional office in New York City on Feb. 26, 1998  This interview concerns Thomas Hart Benton's murals at the New School Art Center.

Total: 2 digital audio files; 1:14:00; transcribed 37 pages.

 

Elisabeth (Lili) Wildenhain Oral History Interview with Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1995

Elisabeth (Lili) Wildenhain (b. 1919 d. 2004)

Fiber Artist and Educator, Pittsford, New York

Interviewer: Robert F. Brown

Interview of Elisabeth (Lili) Wildenhain conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution at the artist's home in Pittsford, New York on August 22, 1995. Wildenhain talks about her childhood in a wealthy, cosmopolitan German-speaking family in Bohemia; her early interests and schooling; her work at the American Fine Arts and Monuments service; designing costumes and clothes in Kansas City following her first marriage; studying with Oskar Kokoschka; meeting Frans Wildenhain (who she subsequently married), travelling with him to Japan, and coming with him to Rochester, N.Y. where he taught at the School for American Craftsmen; and her problematic financial and health situation.

Total: 2 digital audio files; 1:04:00; transcribed 37 pages.

Linda Nochlin Oral History Interview Conducted by James McElhinney for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2010

JAMES MCELHINNEY:  This is James McElhinney speaking to Linda Nochlin at her home 875 West End Avenue in New York, New York on Wednesday, June 9, 2010. Hello.

LINDA NOCHLIN:  Hi.

JAMES MCELHINNEY:  Nice to be here with you and have this conversation. May we begin by speaking about your life?

LINDA NOCHLIN:  Sure.

JAMES MCELHINNEY:  Where are you from?

James Lechay Oral History Interview Conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1998

This is cassette number one.

ROBERT BROWN:  Hello? This is an interview on July 9, 1998 with James Lechay at his house in Wellfleet, MA.

JAMES LECHAY:  Well, I'm glad to be—

[Audio break.]

ROBERT BROWN:  Well, Jim, I thought we could start out maybe to talk about your family, your background.

JAMES LECHAY:  Yes.

ROBERT BROWN:  You were born in New York but your parents had come from elsewhere.

Tony DeLap Oral History Interview Conducted by Matthew Simms for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2018

MATTHEW SIMMS:  This is Matthew Simms with Tony DeLap at his home in Corona Del Mar on June 8th, Friday, 2018, for the Archives of American Art Smithsonian Institution. How are you feeling this morning, Tony? [Laughs.]

TONY DELAP:  Okay.

MATTHEW SIMMS:  How are you feeling this morning? Good?

TONY DELAP:  I think okay. I've only had one cup of coffee, but I think that I'll make it. [Laughs.]

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