Institute of Design collection

Inclusive Dates: 
1927–1970

This record forms part of the Chicago’s Art-Related Archival Materials: A Terra Foundation Resource project funded by the Terra Foundation for American Art. For this project, the Archives surveyed archival repositories throughout the Chicago region to identify art-related materials contained in their holdings. While the Archives of American Art does not own any of the materials described herein, information about those materials and links to the original repositories have been included when available.

Descriptive Summary

6.0 linear feet of material consisting of the papers of faculty members and individuals associated with the Institute of Design. These records pertain to the establishment of the Institute of Design in Chicago under the direction of Laszlo Moholy-Nagy; financial backing by Chicago's art community; the courses and plan of study of the Institute; the work, theories, and art school of Richard Buckminster Fuller; prefabrication; the work of the Bauhaus staff at Mills College, in Oakland, California; the philosophy, teachings and artistic school of the Bauhaus; the work and contributions of Bauhaus artists such as Walter Gropius, Ludwig van der Rohe, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Serge Chermayeff, and Gyorgy Kepes; and the merger of the Institute of Design with the Illinois Institute of Technology. Restrictions on access: Some files are closed. These include, but are not limited to, Folder 35, Box 2, "Walter Paepcke--Correspondence with Loyal Baker." That file is closed until 2020. Other restrictions may apply.

Biographical Historical Note

The Institute of Design was founded under the name The New Bauhaus: Chicago School of Design in 1937 by László Moholy-Nagy, a Hungarian professor of the Bauhaus school. It was the immediate successor to the German Bauhaus, dissolved in 1933 under National Socialist pressure, and continued its philosophy of modernist, human-centered design. In 1939 the school changed location and was renamed the School of Design. It later merged