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Philip Evergood papers, 1890-1971

Philip Evergood papers, 1890-1971

Evergood, Philip Howard, 1901-1973

Painter

Collection Information

Size: 12.0 linear feet

1 rolled document

Summary: The papers of painter Philip Evergood measure 12 linear feet and date from 1890 to 1971. Found within the papers are biographical materials; personal and business correspondence; writings, including essays, lectures, speeches, and sound recordings of radio appearances; subject files; personal business records; printed material; scrapbooks; artwork, including oil paintings, sketches, and childhood drawings; and photographs of Evergood, his family and friends, and his work.

Biographical materials include curriculum vitae, forms, memberships, and the contact information of friends and acquaintances. Correspondence is with business associates and artists, including Charles Edward Smith, Rockwell Kent, Frank Kleinholz, Leon Kroll, Joan Miro, and Yasuo Kuniyoshi. Writings consist primarily of Evergood's artist statements, essays, lectures and speeches, as well as notes, transcripts, and recordings of broadcast radio shows. Subject files focus on art institutions and organizations, funding opportunities, and political topics of personal interest.

Personal business records include artist lists, contracts with galleries, and banking and estate records. Printed materials include clippings, four clippings scrapbooks, exhibition catalogs, and periodicals with articles featuring Evergood. There are loose sketches and mixed media, including oils and watercolors, of Evergood's artwork. Photographs are of Evergood, his friends and family, and photographs and negatives of his artwork.

Biographical/Historical Note

Painter and printmaker Philip Evergood (1901-1973) lived and worked in New York City and Bridgewater, Connecticut and was known as an expressionist and social realist who incorporated elements of the fantastic into his works.

Provenance

Philip Evergood donated his papers to the Archives in 1971. Additional materials were donated in 1974 by Evergood's wife, Julia Cross Evergood. In 1977, two typescripts of essays were donated by Abram Lerner.

Related Materials

Also found in the Archives of American Art are Letters from Philip Evergood; Gael Hammer letters relating to Miles and Philip Evergood; an oral history interview with Philip Evergood by Forrest Selvig, December 3, 1968; and Philip Evergood interview with John I.H. Baur, June 1959.

A Finding Aid to the Philip Evergood Papers, 1890-1971, in the Archives of American Art
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Biographical/Historical note
Painter and printmaker Philip Evergood (1901-1973) lived and worked in New York City and Bridgewater, Connecticut and was known as an expressionist and social realist who incorporated elements of the fantastic into his works. A native New Yorker, Evergood's father, Miles Blashki, was a Polish-Australian artist, and his mother, Flora Jane Perry, was English. At his mother's insistence, Evergood attended boarding schools in England and graduated from Eton in 1919. He left Cambridge University to pursue art studies at London's Slade School of Fine Arts and returned to America in 1923 to study with George Luks at the Art Students League.
In 1927, Evergood held his first one man show at New York's Dudensing Gallery and continued to travel back and forth between France, Spain, and America throughout the 1920s. In 1931, he married dancer and actress Julia Cross and found work as a muralist and painter for the WPA Federal Arts Project in the early 1930s. From 1937-1938, he served as president of the New York Artists Union and, along with other social realist painters, joined Herman Baron's stable at the ACA (American Contemporary Art) Gallery, where he exhibited several one man shows during the late 1930s and 1940s.
During the 1940s and 1950s, Evergood was a popular lecturer and taught at art schools, including the Skowhegan School, and began producing large scale lithographs and etchings along with his paintings. While working as a picture framer for additional income, he met the art collector Joseph Hirshhorn who would purchase 10 artworks at their first meeting and become a life long patron. He continued to exhibit his work at the ACA Gallery and the annual contemporary shows of major museums, such as the Carnegie Institute and the Art Institute of Chicago. Evergood exhibited in over 35 exhibitions, including a retrospective at the Whitney Museum in 1960, and died in a house fire in Bridgewater in 1973.
Arrangement note
The collection is arranged as 9 series.
Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1930-1971 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1, OV 13)
Series 2: Correspondence, 1930-1970 (3.5 linear feet; Boxes 1-4)
Series 3: Writings, 1905-1970 (1.7 linear feet; Boxes 4-5)
Series 4: Subject Files, 1919-1971 (0.7 linear feet; Boxes 5-6)
Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1902-1970 (0.5 linear feet; Box 6)
Series 6: Printed Material, 1914-1970 (2.3 linear feet; Boxes 7-9, 11)
Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1924-1954 (0.6 linear feet; Boxes 11-12)
Series 8: Artwork, 1905-1970 (1.4 linear feet; Box 9, OV 14-20, RD 23)
Series 9: Photographic Materials, 1890-1970 (1.1 linear feet; Boxes 9-10, OV 21-22)
Provenance
Philip Evergood donated his papers to the Archives in 1971. Additional materials were donated in 1974 by Evergood's wife, Julia Cross Evergood. In 1977, two typescripts of essays were donated by Abram Lerner.
Processing Information note
Materials received a preliminary level of arrangement after donation and portions of the collection were microfilmed onto reels 429-430, 1345-1355, 439, 2162, 2223, 1885, and 2804. The collection was processed to an intermediate level and a finding aid prepared by Judy Ng in 2015, with funding provided by the Terra Foundation for American Art. The Archives of American Art has implemented minimal processing tactics when possible in order to increase information about and access to more of our collections.
Intermediate processing included arrangement to the series and folder levels with greater attention to the artwork and photographic materials series. For other series, items within folders were generally verified with folder titles, but not arranged further. The collection was rehoused in archival containers and folders.

Additional Forms Available

Portions of this collection are available on 35 mm microfilm reels 429-430, 1345-1355, 439, 2162, 2223, 1885, and 2804 at the Archives of American Art offices, and through interlibrary loan. Researchers should note that the arrangement of the papers as described in this finding aid does not reflect the order of the collection on microfilm due to reprocessing and not all of the collection is on microfilm. Some of the sound recordings in this collection have been copied for research access and digital copies are available in the Archives of American Art offices.

Restrictions on Access

Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.

How to Cite This Collection

Philip Evergood papers, 1890-1971. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

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