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Louis Lozowick papers, 1898-1974

Lozowick, Louis, 1892-1973

Lithographer, Painter

The papers of Louis Lozowick in the Archives of American Art were digitized from 7 reels of microfilm in 2007. The bulk of the papers have been scanned, and total 10,057 images.

Funding for the digitization of the microfilm of this collection was provided by the Terra Foundation for American Art. Glass plate negatives in this collection were digitized in 2019 with funding provided by the Smithsonian Women's Committee.

Collection Information

Size: 5.9 Linear feet

Summary: The Louis Lozowick Papers measure 5.9 linear feet and are dated 1898-1974. Correspondence, writings, business records, printed material and photographs document Lozowick's career. Also included are biographical documents, sketches, and records relating to organizations that interested him.

Biographical/Historical Note

Louis Lozowick (1892-1973) is known for his lithographs of New York City, many in the Precisionist mode. As a very young boy in the Ukraine, Lozowick showed an aptitude for drawing. At age eleven, with an older brother, he moved from his rural hometown to Kiev, where he received training at the Kiev Art Institute. In 1906, Lozowick came to the United States, joining a brother in New Jersey. While in high school, and for several years afterwards, Lozowick studied at the National Academy of Design under Leon Kroll, George Willloughby Maynard, Ivan Olinsky, and Douglas Volk. He graduated from Ohio State University in 1918 with a degree in art.

Provenance

Gift of Louis and Adele Lozowick, 1966-1980. Various portions were microfilmed on reels D254-D254A, and 1333-1337. In 2004, all portions of the gift were merged, reprocessed, and remicrofilmed.

Language Note

Some records are in Russian, Yiddish, German, and French. Russian; Yiddish; German; French

Funding

Funding for the digitization of the microfilm of this collection was provided by the Terra Foundation for American Art. Glass plate negatives in this collection were digitized in 2019 with funding provided by the Smithsonian Women's Committee.