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A Finding Aid to the Alexander Calder papers, 1926-1967: More Information | Digitized Collection

Alexander Calder papers, 1926-1967

More Information

A Finding Aid to the Alexander Calder Papers, 1926-1967, in the Archives of American Art
AAA.caldalex
Finding aid prepared by Erin Corley
Scope and Content Note
The papers of abstract kinetic artist and sculptor Alexander Calder measure 2.5 linear feet and date from 1926 to 1967. Found within the papers are scattered biographical materials, correspondence, printed materials, photographs, scattered prints and sketches by Calder, and a scrapbook. Of particular interest are the numerous photographs of Calder, including many of Calder at work in his studios, with his family at their home in Touraine, France, exhibitions, and artwork. Among the photographs are several taken by photographer and artist Herbert Matter and a photograph of Pierre Matisse at Calder's home.
Biographical material contains a few of Calder's personal documents, including a passport and address lists, as well as writings. Correspondence is scattered and of a general nature, including letters about exhibitions and artwork, and postcards from friends, some of which are illustrated. The printed material contains exhibition invitations and catalogs, news clippings, and magazines, primarily about Calder's career. Also found is scattered artwork by Calder and others, and a scrapbook of news clippings dating from 1926-1932.
Language
English
Provenance
The collection was donated in 1963 by Alexander Calder and was microfilmed shortly after receipt.
Related Material
The Archives also has a transcribed interview of Alexander Calder, conducted October 26, 1971 by Paul Cummings for the Archives of American Art.
Funding
Funding for the processing and digitization of this collection was provided by the Terra Foundation for American Art.
Processing Information
The collection received preliminary processing at some point after donation and the collection was microfilmed on reel D305. It was fully processed, arranged and described by Erin Corley and scanned in 2005, with funding provided by the Terra Foundation for American Art.