More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

August 4, 2007 - October 14, 2007
Exhibited in the Archives of American Art’s New York Research Center

More Than Words book
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Often the expression of joy or affection, illustrated letters represent an irrepressible urge to picture language. They are evidence of the writer’s use of words and images to amplify the form and effect of a message. The letters have been selected by Liza Kirwin, and are drawn entirely from the collections of the Archives of American Art, encompassing exuberant thank you notes, winsome love letters, lively reports of current events, graphic instructions and other personalized communiques from the early nineteenth century through the 1980s, in each sender’s distinctive style.

This exhibition supplements the publication of the book More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art published by Princeton Architectural Press.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

George Benjamin Luks to Samuel Ross Ballin

George Benjamin Luks to Samuel Ross Ballin, ca. 1930

Creator: George Benjamin Luks

Letter from painter George Luks (1867–1933) to his friend lawyer and art dealer Samuel Ballin (1902–1985), February 4, 193-?. George and Will Luks letters to Samuel Ballin.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Warren Chappell to Isabel Bishop

Warren Chappell to Isabel Bishop, Sept. 12, 1982

Creator: Warren Chappell

With his distinctive wit and wisdom, illustrator Warren Chappell (1904-1991) wrote to his friend Isabel Bishop (1902-1988), on September 12, 1982:

"It is our hope (as artists) {constant, divine, desperate, naïve, nagging, and infinite} that the picture is never as bleak as painted."

Isabel Bishop papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Warren Chappell letter to Isabel Bishop

Warren Chappell letter to Isabel Bishop, 1982 Sept. 6

Creator: Warren Chappell

Illustrator Warren Chappell (1904-1991) wrote to his friend Isabel Bishop (1902-1988),

"I've just thrown a couple of drawings away and I realize—there's no friend like a trash basket."

Postcard, September 6, 1982. Isabel Bishop papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Warren Chappell to Isabel Bishop

Warren Chappell to Isabel Bishop, Feb. 21, 1978

Creator: Warren Chappell

In this letter from Warren Chappell (1904-1991) to his friend Isabel Bishop (1902-1988), he quotes Ralph Waldo Emerson, "A painter told me that nobody could draw a tree without in some sort becoming a tree," to illustrate the process of aging.

Isabel Bishop papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Robert Frederick Blum to Minnie Gerson

Robert Frederick Blum to Minnie Gerson, Dec. 6, 1883

Creator: Robert Frederick Blum

Painter and illustrator Robert Frederick Blum (1857-1903) wrote this letter to "Miss Minnie [Gerson]," sketching his idea for her family’s Christmas card, ca. 1880.

He jokingly wrote: "It is fatal to be afflicted with inspiration that won't be controlled."

On the last page he described the sights and sounds outside his window: "the hand organ with its cheerful waltzes toots and groans its hacking and rheumatic notes through it all."

Robert Frederick Blum papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Max Bohm to Emilie Bohm

Max Bohm to Emilie Bohm, May 12, 1889

Creator: Max Bohm

Letter from Max Bohm (1868–1923) to his mother Emilie Bohm, May 12, 1889, describing his first "vernisage" at the Paris Universal Exposition of 1889:

"I wore a simple Prince Albert, black kid gloves, white tie and high hat and did not look bad (pas mal). We spent five hours in the Salon and amused ourselves greatly... Never in the whole world has such a world exhibition been arranged as this one... Everything is done in almost unbelievable splendor and artistic elegance. One can see everything the world has to offer in art, science, curiosities and industry. You can't picture the grandeur and splendor to be seen now in Paris. And all that for 14 cents" (original in German).

Max Bohm papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Max Bohm to Emilie Bohm

Max Bohm to Emilie Bohm, Mar. 3, 1889

Creator: Max Bohm

Letter from Max Bohm (1868–1923) to his mother Emilie Bohm, March 3, 1889, in which he compares the "Harrison school" in Paris with his current class at Delance:

"It is rather difficult to join the Harrison school because the school constitution permits only 30 students. Now I know a little about wire pulling. All the students are friends of mine. I know Harrison personally and talked to him today in his atelier... At Delance you get your scolding but nothing is said about the mistakes and they are not even pointed out. I lost much courage and learned nothing... Under no circumstances will I remain with Delance." (original in German). He includes a sketch of the atelier.

Max Bohm papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Max Bohm letter to Emilie Bohm

Max Bohm letter to Emilie Bohm, 1899 Sept. 14

Creator: Max Bohm

Letter from painter Max Bohm (1868−1923) to his parents, September 14, 1899. Born in Cleveland Ohio, Bohm spent most of his painting career in Europe, but he was also an early force in the Provincetown art community. In December 1898, he met and married Zella Newcomb. They were living in Etaples, Pas de Calais, France, when he wrote this note describing the local color. Max Bohm papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

George H. Clements to J. Eastman Chase

George H. Clements to J. Eastman Chase, Sept. 10, 1887

Creator: George H. Clements

Letter from painter George Clements (1854–1935) requesting pictures from art dealer J. Eastman Chase, September 10, 1887. Clements writes: *I’m as thirsty as the cracked earth for somebody else’s art -- great God! Chase, think of living the long hot months with one’s own pictures! It’s worse than an earthquake!* At the conclusion of the letter Clements made two self portrait sketches of *before receiving them* and *after.* J. Eastman Chase papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alexander Calder to Agnes Rindge Claflin

Alexander Calder to Agnes Rindge Claflin, June 6, 1936

Creator: Alexander Calder

Letter from sculptor Alexander Calder (1898-1976) to educator, collector, and director of the Vassar Art Gallery, Agnes Rindge Claflin, concerning the colors of one of his works, June 6, 1939. Agnes Rindge Claflin papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Dorothea Tanning to Joseph Cornell

Dorothea Tanning to Joseph Cornell, Apr. 29, 1947

Creator: Dorothea Tanning

Letter from surrealist artist Dorothea Tanning (b. 1910) to Joseph Cornell (1903–1972), April 29, 1947. Tanning discusses the possibility of expanding Cornell’s audience on the West Coast. She writes: *Some nice lads from Hollywood came here last week (just at the moment of my return home). They are opening a surrealist gallery and were full of enthusiasm for your work. We all spoke of you, of your own special genius, of their plans for showing it to the west-coast public. Well, I hope for their success.* The lads Tanning mentions were William Copley and John Ployardt, who opened the Copley Gallery in Beverly Hills, California. Cornell showed at the gallery in 1948 and it is after this opening that he began to be well known in California. His collectors included famous Hollywood celebrities Tony Curtis and Billy Wilder. Joseph Cornell papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Dorothea Tanning to Joseph Cornell

Dorothea Tanning to Joseph Cornell, Mar. 3, 1948

Creator: Dorothea Tanning

Letter from Dorothea Tanning (b. 1910) to Joseph Cornell (1903–1972), March 3, 1948. In her autobiography Between Lives [Dorothea Tanning. New York: WW Norton and Co, 2001.] Tanning writes of her correspondence with Cornell, saying *I tried to decorate my letters his way* (90). Joseph Cornell papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

J. Carroll (James Carroll) Beckwith to John M. Donaldson

J. Carroll (James Carroll) Beckwith to John M. Donaldson, 1913

Creator: J. Carroll (James Carroll) Beckwith

Letter from painter Carroll Beckwith (1852−1917) to architect John M. Donaldson (1854−1941) in which Beckwith affixes a pencil sketch he made of Donaldson while he was a student at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, ca. 1876. John M. Donaldson papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Gari Melchers to John M. Donaldson

Gari Melchers to John M. Donaldson, Jan. 24, 1896?

Creator: Gari Melchers

Letter from painter Gari Melchers (1860−1932) to John M. Donaldson (1854−1941). Melchers instructs Donaldson to make the interior details of his home *a little more Dutch,* January 24, ca. 1896, John M. Donaldson papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Frans Wildenhain to Kitty C. L. Fischer

Frans Wildenhain to Kitty C. L. Fischer, between 1955 and 1967

Creator: Frans Wildenhain

Letter from potter Frans Wildenhain (1905−1980) to weaver Kitty C. L. Fischer and her husband Hermann, an architect, undated. The Fischers, both of Holland, became acquainted with Wildenhain as fellow students at the Bauhaus. Kitty C. L. Fisher papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Unidentified sender letter to Mimi Floch

Unidentified sender letter to Mimi Floch, circa 1910

A get-well letter to Mimi [Floch] from her friend Gretl, ca. 1910. Gretl pictures two bears crying over the news of Mimi's illness and praying for her quick recovery (in German). Joseph Floch papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Joseph Floch to Mimi Floch

Joseph Floch to Mimi Floch, ca. 1930

Creator: Joseph Floch

Letter from Joseph Floch (1895–1977) to wife Mimi Floch (in German). ca. 1930 (while in Paris). Joseph Floch papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1913 Mar. 21

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880-1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Letter from Alfred J. Frueh (1880–1968) to Giuliette Fancuilli, giving his first impression of the Salon des Independents in Paris: *There is some good stuff out there though, but the average -- ugh.* He also compares his view of the cubist canvases to riding a bike down stone steps, March 21, 1913. The Salon des Independents was an annual exhibition established in 1884 in response to the rigid orthodoxy of the government supported Salon. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1913 Mar. 24

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880−1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Letter from Alfred J. Frueh (1880–1968) to Giuliette Fancuilli, giving his second impressions of the Salon des Independents in Paris and asking her to send him reviews of a De Zayas exhibition, March 24, 1913. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1912 Dec. 13

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880−1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Letter from Alfred J. Frueh (1880–1968) to Giuliette Fancuilli, Dec. 13, 1912. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1913 Feb. 8

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880−1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Letter from Alfred J. Frueh (1880–1968) to Giuliette Fancuilli, Feb. 8 1913. Frueh writes about Fancuilli’s trip to St. Louis to see his exhibit. While Frueh was in Europe, collector/gallery owner Alfred Stieglitz mounted a show of his drawings that was viewed in New York, St Louis and Boston. While it was well received, Frueh claims he has a swelled head” not because of the the show’s success, but because of Fancuilli’s affection. He writes “You would [have a swelled head] too if you were me and 7 months away from home and alone in Paris and someone you wanted real bad believed you were living and spent 3 whole days working a letter to you. Wouldn’t cha now?” Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1913 Apr. 1

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880−1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Letter from Alfred J. Frueh (1880–1968) to Giuliette Fancuilli, April 1, 1913. At the close of this letter, Frueh explains why it is written in a wavy hand: “Perhaps you think I’m drunk, but you’re not to read this letter till you’re out on the ocean and there you will see how nicely these lines fit in with the motion of the boat. I’m writing this on a rocking chair.” Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, Apr. 25, 1913

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880−1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Letter from Alfred J. Frueh (1880–1968) to Giuliette Fancuilli, April 25, 1913. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1912 Aug. 25

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880−1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Frueh writes to Guiliette from Venice, August, 25, 1912. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1912 Sept.

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880−1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Frueh writes to Guiliette from Holland, ca. September 1912. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, Sept. 17, 1912

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880-1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Alfred J. Frueh sends a bouquet from Besançon, France, to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, September 17, 1912. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1912 Oct.

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880?1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Frueh writes to Guiliette from Scotland, October 1912. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1912 Oct. 24

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880−1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Frueh writes to Guiliette from Dublin, Ireland, October 24, 1912. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1912 Nov. 7

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880−1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Frueh writes to Guiliette from Paris, November 7, 1912. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1912 Nov. 28

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880−1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Frueh writes to Guiliette from Paris, November 28, 1912. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1912 Dec. 3

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880−1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Frueh writes to Guiliette from Paris, December 3, 1912. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1913 Jan. 1

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880−1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Frueh writes to Guiliette from Paris, January 1, 1913. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh letter to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh letter to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1913 Jan. 29

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880-1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Frueh writes to Guiliette from Paris, January 29, 1913, showing how happily obsessed he is with her letters, which he calls “pinkies.” Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh letter to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh letter to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1913 Jan. 6

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880-1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Frueh writes to Guiliette January 6, 1913. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1913 Apr. 13

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

Alfred J. Frueh (1880−1968) was known for his caricatures of theater personalities. He drew cartoons and illustrated stories for The World, contributed a weekly drawing to Life magazine from 1920 to 1921, and his caricatures appeared in The New Yorker magazine from its first issue in 1925 until 1962. In this series of humorous letters to his fiancée Guiliette Fancuilli, he described his travels through Europe in 1912 and 1913, in each he pictures himself immersed in the culture and often in native costume. Frueh writes to Guiliette April 13, 1913. Alfred J. Frueh papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Paul Bransom to Helen Ireland Hays

Paul Bransom to Helen Ireland Hays, 1943

Creator: Paul Bransom

Letter from illustrator Paul Bransom (1885−1979) to Helen and Jimmy Hays. In the 1920s, the Bransoms built a home and studio at Canada Lake in the Adirondacks, where they were part of a small summer colony of artist and writers including Helen Hays, Clare Dwiggins, his daughter Phoebe Dwiggins, Todhunter Ballard, Charles Sarka, Margaret Widdemer, Mabel Cleland, Herbert Asbury, Emily Hahn, and James Thurber. In this 1943 letter Bransom paints his home studio. Helen I. Hays papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Paul Bransom to Helen Ireland Hays

Paul Bransom to Helen Ireland Hays, Feb. 19, 1942

Creator: Paul Bransom

Letter from illustrator Paul Bransom (1885-1979) to Helen and Jimmy Hays. In the 1920s, the Bransoms built a home and studio at Canada Lake in the Adirondacks, where they were part of a small summer colony of artist and writers including Helen Hays, Clare Dwiggins, his daughter Phoebe Dwiggins, Todhunter Ballard, Charles Sarka, Margaret Widdemer, Mabel Cleland, Herbert Asbury, Emily Hahn, and James Thurber. In a letter dated February 19, 1942, Bransom dreams of their summer vacation home. Helen I. Hays papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Frederic Edwin Church to Martin Johnson Heade.

Frederic Edwin Church to Martin Johnson Heade., 1870 Mar. 7

Creator: Frederic Edwin Church

Letter from Frederick Edwin Church (1826-1900) to fellow painter Martin Johnson Heade (1819-1904), March 7, 1870. Church writes about the chill of winter in New York, and teases Heade for not finding the Santa Marta Mountain when he was standing at its foot, suggesting that a cloud of mosquitoes had obscured his view. Church and Heade shared a studio in the Tenth Street Studio Building in New York. Martin Johnson Heade papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

George Grosz letter to Erich S. Herrmann

George Grosz letter to Erich S. Herrmann, 1945

Creator: George Grosz

Letter from painter and printmaker George Grosz (1893−1959) inviting his friend Erich S. Herrmann to his birthday party, undated. Erich S. Herrmann papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Rockwell Kent to Frances Kent

Rockwell Kent to Frances Kent, 1931 July 16

Creator: Rockwell Kent

Letter from Rockwell Kent (1882–1971) to Frances, his second wife on July 16, 1931. Kent is in Igdlorssuit, an island in Greenland, and he includes a sketch of the view from his home there, as well as a sectional of the house. Rockwell Kent papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Rockwell Kent to Frances Kent

Rockwell Kent to Frances Kent, 1929

Creator: Rockwell Kent

Letter from Rockwell Kent (1882–1971) to Frances, 1929. Rockwell Kent papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Eero Saarinen letter to Florence Knoll Bassett

Eero Saarinen letter to Florence Knoll Bassett, 1935-1936

Creator: Eero Saarinen

The papers of architect and interior designer Florence Knoll Bassett (b. 1917) include a series of illustrated letters from architect Eero Saarinen (1910−1961). In the mid-to-late 1930s, when this letter was written, she attended the Cranbrook Academy of Art, then the Architectural Association in London, and spent summers with the Saarinens. In an annotation among her papers she wrote: *Eero spend a year in Helsingfors working for an architectural firm. It is obvious from his illustrated letters that he preferred drawing to the written word. We all enjoyed the results.* Florence Knoll Bassett papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Julia Stephenson to Charles M. (Charles McMeen) Kurtz

Julia Stephenson to Charles M. (Charles McMeen) Kurtz, 1883 Dec. 9

Creator: Julia Stephenson

Letter from Julia Stephenson (1861–1931) to Charles M. Kurtz (1855–1909), December 9, 1883. Stephenson discusses the character types of girls and how she herself could never be considered a *coquette.* Using the sketches she provides at the beginning of the letter she writes: *My course of study has never been directed to this subject; but causal observation has shown to me two classes of girls which I try to feebly illustrate above…I most surely cannot recall anything I have done to cause you to think I would enjoy the experience of No. 1. Now very seriously, I think such a remark is very ungenerous to say the least, and if it were repeated, and I should only have the opportunity, I fear I would do worse than pull out your mustache and whiskers. I might come near choking you to death! Among the class of girls shown by fig No. 2, there are some poor unfortunate girls of whom I have heard, whose unhappy fate caused them sometimes very unintentionally to inflict wounds upon their best friends, and that is bad enough on the poor girl. I suppose but to delight in committing such wrongs is just meaner than I ever want to know how to be! If I am just a little bit wicked, I am not near wicked enough for that even if I did know something about how to be!* Charles M. Kurtz papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Julia Stephenson to Charles M. Kurtz

Julia Stephenson to Charles M. Kurtz, 1884 Dec.

Creator: Julia Stephenson

Letter from Julia Stephenson (1861–1931) to Charles M. Kurtz (1855–1909), December 1884. Stephenson has sketched the items from her purse, including a hat pin and a pictures of Kurtz. Charles M. Kurtz papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Charles M. Kurtz to Julia Stephenson

Charles M. Kurtz to Julia Stephenson, 1884 Dec. 17

Creator: Charles M. (Charles McMeen) Kurtz

Letter from Charles M. Kurtz (1855–1909) to future wife Julia Stephenson (1861–1931), December 17, 1884. In 1884 Kurtz accepted a position at the American Art Association. In this letter, written on the first day of his curatorial job, he discusses his recent opening there and compares the art galleries to the ones back in Louisville where he met Stephenson: *The main gallery here has a high, carved vaulted ceiling, with skylights in the center, concealed by a screen of light material, so that the light, though strong, is soft. The sides are hung with crimson material, below which is a handsomely carved dado of dark wood. In the center of one side is a high chimney with an open fireplace, in which some logs of wood are kept burning, on some antique brass and irons. The chimney is a reproduction of an old Dutch chimney from some old castle. It projects into the room four or five feet, and one can stand inside of it, beside the fire. This hasty sketch may give you a slight idea of the affair.* Charles M. Kurtz papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Halsey C. Ives to Charles M. Kurtz

Halsey C. Ives to Charles M. Kurtz, 1889 June 7

Creator: Halsey C. (Halsey Cooley) Ives

Letter from Professor Halsey C. Ives (1847–1911) of the St. Louis School of Fine Arts a department of Washington University, to Charles M. Kurtz (1855–1909), June 7, 1889, with a sketch of the floor plan of the St. Louis Museum with a new addition and Ives’ new home. Ives writes: *Next week, or soon after, ground will be broken for the foundation of the new wing of the museum as below: I shall put in one story of this with a temporary roof and use the room for the school and beg for money enough to finish it.* Even with the addition Ives describes, the museum and art school had outgrown its downtown location by the mid 1890’s, and plans were underway to relocate the St. Louis Art Museum to its current location in Forest Park. Charles M. Kurtz papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Charles Ward Rhodes to Charles M. Kurtz

Charles Ward Rhodes to Charles M. Kurtz, 1893 Oct. 5

Creator: Charles Ward Rhodes

Letter from associate Charles Ward Rhodes to Charles M. Kurtz (1855–1909), October 5, 1893, with sketch of a painting by Léon Gagneau at the St. Louis Exposition. Rhodes writes Kurtz about pricing several pieces in the gallery and his hopes for lowering the prices of two paintings: *I fear I made a mistake in not giving out the prices a little higher than they were given me so that I could have made a little reduction. As it is, especially as regards the French pictures I have but one price and people all seem to feel that if I state the price as $500.00 for example, they can of course obtain the painting for $300.00.* Charles M. Kurtz papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Helen Lockwood Colburn letter to

Helen Lockwood Colburn letter to "my dear Rolle", 1874 Aug. 26

Creator: Helen Lockwood Colburn

Letter from portrait painter Helen Lockwood Colburn (d. 1912) to *Roll,* visually describing the joys of country life, August 26, 1874. Rembrandt Lockwood papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Maynard Dixon to William Macbeth

Maynard Dixon to William Macbeth, 1923 June 26

Creator: Maynard Dixon

Letter from Maynard Dixon (1875-1946) to William Macbeth, June 26, 1923. At the close of the letter, Dixon, a western painter, urges Macbeth to *come to Arizona and cool off.* Macbeth Gallery records.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Winslow Homer to Gustav Reicard

Winslow Homer to Gustav Reicard, Mar. 17, 1893

Creator: Winslow Homer

Letter from Winslow Homer (1836–1910) to William Macbeth (1851–1917), Richard and Gentlemen, March 17, 1893. In this letter Winslow discusses the pricing of his paintings Murray Hill and Fox Hunt . He bemoans the fact that portraits are fetching high prices, and describes Fox Hunt , his latest winter landscape painting as, *quite an unusual and very beautiful picture -- price should be no object to anyone wishing it.* Macbeth Gallery records.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Fred Dana Marsh to unidentified artist

Fred Dana Marsh to unidentified artist, ca. 19--

Creator: Fred Dana Marsh

Letter from Fred Dana Marsh (1872–1961) to unidentified artist. January 8, 19--. Marsh is responding to a fellow artist’s *sermon* which he thoroughly appreciated and illustrates at the conclusion of the letter. Fred discusses *this word motif seems to me all important -- at least I have been happy since I possessed it. But to convince you that my motif is good or at least my intentions are, I will begin by stating that the machine is one of the greatest salvations of man.* Fred Dana Marsh illustrated letters.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Gio Ponti to Esther McCoy

Gio Ponti to Esther McCoy, 1968 Apr. 28

Creator: Gio Ponti

The papers of architectural historian Esther McCoy (1904?1989) include a series of affectionate illustrated letters from Italian architect and designer Gio Ponti (1891?1979). Ponti's concept of total design extended to these fanciful communications from 1968 and 1978. Esther McCoy papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Gio Ponti to Esther McCoy

Gio Ponti to Esther McCoy, Jan. 25, 1978

Creator: Gio Ponti

The papers of architectural historian Esther McCoy (1904−1989) include a series of affectionate illustrated letters from Italian architect and designer Gio Ponti (1891−1979). Ponti's concept of total design extended to these fanciful communications from 1968 and 1978. Esther McCoy papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Gio Ponti to Esther McCoy

Gio Ponti to Esther McCoy, Nov. 17, 1971

Creator: Gio Ponti

The papers of architectural historian Esther McCoy (1904−1989) include a series of affectionate illustrated letters from Italian architect and designer Gio Ponti (1891−1979). Ponti's concept of total design extended to these fanciful communications from 1968 and 1978. Esther McCoy papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Gio Ponti to Esther McCoy

Gio Ponti to Esther McCoy, ca. 1978

Creator: Gio Ponti

The papers of architectural historian Esther McCoy (1904?1989) include a series of affectionate illustrated letters from Italian architect and designer Gio Ponti (1891?1979). Ponti's concept of total design extended to these fanciful communications from 1968 and 1978. Esther McCoy papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Roberta Shelton Skoog to Bror Julius Olsson Nordfeldt

Roberta Shelton Skoog to Bror Julius Olsson Nordfeldt, Sept. 16, 1948

Creator: Roberta Shelton Skoog

Letter from former student Roberta Shelton Skoog to Bror Julius Olsson (B.J.O.) Nordfeldt (1878–1955), September 16, 1948. This letter brings Nordfeldt up to date on the actions of his fellow students, specifically Shelton Skoog’s own time in Paris. She apparently does not like the Art School situation when she writes: *We now come to ART SCHOOL… Namely the Grande Chaumiere in Montparnasse All us kids were or are going there off and on. It’s a terrible school crammed with American G.I.s and French students in beards and corduroy hats who are developing the pointillist technique. I have seen one teacher there so far, a certain Yves Brayer who does pretty little landscapes and wears a revolting thin yellow beard following the curve of jaw to ear.* Nordfeldt taught Shelton Skoog at the Minneapolis School of Art in 1944. Bror Julius Olsson (B.J.O.) Nordfeldt papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Roberta Shelton Skoog to Bror Julius Olsson Nordfeldt

Roberta Shelton Skoog to Bror Julius Olsson Nordfeldt, ca. 1946

Creator: Roberta Shelton Skoog

Letter from former student Roberta Shelton to Bror Julius Olsson (B.J.O.) Nordfeldt (1878–1955), ca. 1946. Nordfeldt taught Skoog at the Minneapolis School of Art in 1944. This letter is a request from Shelton and her fellow classmates to visit Nordfeldt on his farm in New Jersey while they are visiting New York: *Let me state that we wish quite desperately to see you, that at the slightest bidding, we will come tearing down to Lambertville (wherever that may be) and attempt for a couple hours to conduct ourselves in dignified and unobtrusive style.* Nordfeldt was a popular teacher, well liked by his students. Bror Julius Olsson (B.J.O.) Nordfeldt papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Joyce MacInnes to Bror Julius Olsson Nordfeldt

Joyce MacInnes to Bror Julius Olsson Nordfeldt, ca. 1946

Creator: Joyce MacInnes

Letter from former student Joyce MacInnes to Bror Julius Olsson (B.J.O.) Nordfeldt (1878–1955), ca. 1946. Nordfeldt taught MacInnes at the Minneapolis School of Art in 1944. Bror Julius Olsson (B.J.O.) Nordfeldt papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Miné Okubo letter to Roy Leeper

Miné Okubo letter to Roy Leeper, 1974 January 3

Creator: Miné Okubo

Painter Miné Okubo (1912−2001) is best known for her book Citizen 13660, a memoir of her experience as a Japanese American detained at the Tanforan Assembly Center south of San Francisco, and then the relocation center at Topaz, Utah. After January 1944, she settled in Greenwich Village and continued to paint until her death in 2001. These three letters are part of Okubo’s illustrated correspondence with collectors Roy Leeper and Gaylord Hall in the early 1970s. Okubo to Leeper January 3, 1974.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Miné Okubo to Roy Leeper

Miné Okubo to Roy Leeper, Sept. 25, 1973

Creator: Miné Okubo

Painter Miné Okubo (1912−2001) is best known for her book Citizen 13660, a memoir of her experience as a Japanese American detained at the Tanforan Assembly Center south of San Francisco, and then the relocation center at Topaz, Utah. After January 1944, she settled in Greenwich Village and continued to paint until her death in 2001. These three letters are part of Okubo’s illustrated correspondence with collectors Roy Leeper and Gaylord Hall in the early 1970s. Okubo to Leeper September 25, 1973.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Miné Okubo to Roy Leeper

Miné Okubo to Roy Leeper, May 18, 1971

Creator: Miné Okubo

Painter Miné Okubo (1912-2001) is best known for her book Citizen 13660, a memoir of her experience as a Japanese American detained at the Tanforan Assembly Center south of San Francisco, and then the relocation center at Topaz, Utah. After January 1944, she settled in Greenwich Village and continued to paint until her death in 2001. These three letters are part of Okubo’s illustrated correspondence with collectors Roy Leeper and Gaylord Hall in the early 1970s. Okubo to Leeper May 18, 1971.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

John French Sloan letter to Walter Pach

John French Sloan letter to Walter Pach, 1922 Aug. 4

Creator: John French Sloan

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

John Sloan letter to Walter Pach

John Sloan letter to Walter Pach, 1920 June 9

Creator: John French Sloan

Illustrated letter from painter John Sloan (1871-1951) in Santa Fe, to artist and art writer Walter Pach (1883-1958). In his letter dated June 9, 1920, Sloan made a sketch of his Santa Fe studio including local models and large moths. He wrote: *I have started painting - nearly a week went by before I felt ready - a Corpus Christi procession through the roads and over the bridge Sunday - gave me a theme.* Walter Pach papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Edith Schloss letter to Philip and Dorothy Pearlstein

Edith Schloss letter to Philip and Dorothy Pearlstein, 1981 March 25

Creator: Edith Schloss

Letter from painter, writer and critic Edith Schloss to Philip Pearlstein (b. 1924), March 25, 1981. On the verso of the thank-you note, Schloss writes: *I wish we had a national archives here to give all my junk and diaries to—I’m not good a throwing away things.* During Schloss’s stay in New York, Pearlstein may have mentioned the Archives of American Art as an appropriate repository. He donated his papers to the Archives in installments from 1975 to 1999. Schloss later donated her papers to the Archives as well. Philip Pearlstein papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Marcia Tucker to Italo Scanga

Marcia Tucker to Italo Scanga, Mar. 1, 1973

Creator: Marcia Tucker

Letter from collector, curator and art historian Marcia Tucker to Italo Scanga (1932–2001). March 1, 1973. *Tucker* curated Scanga’s show at the Whitney in 1972. Italo Scanga papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Italo Scanga to Dale Chihuly

Italo Scanga to Dale Chihuly, 1997 Sept. 19

Creator: Italo Scanga

Letter from Italo Scanga (1932–2001) to artist Dale Chihuly (b. 1941), September 19, 1997. This letter is birthday greetings from Scanga to Chihuly. Scanga describes his circumstances on September 20, 1941, the day Chihuly was born. Italo Scanga papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Dale Chihuly to Italo Scanga

Dale Chihuly to Italo Scanga, Aug. 1, 1995

Creator: Dale Chihuly

Fax from artist Dale Chihuly (b.1941) to Italo Scanga (1932–2001), August 1, 1995. In mid 1995 Chihuly spent three weeks at Waterford Crystal Factory in Ireland. He and his staff resided at nearby Lismore Castle and made about 20 installations on the castle grounds. In this fax Chihuly sketches the locations of several pieces, *glass in the bushes* and *crystal out of the Blackwater River.* Italo Scanga papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Joseph Lindon Smith to  Parents

Joseph Lindon Smith to Parents, ca. May 1891

Creator: Joseph Lindon Smith

Painter Joseph Lindon Smith (1863-1950) penned a note to his parents about his arrival in Dublin, sketching himself as an overloaded traveler. Joseph Lindon Smith papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Joseph Lindon Smith letter to his parents

Joseph Lindon Smith letter to his parents, 1894 Sept. 8

Creator: Joseph Lindon Smith

In this letter to his parents, painter Joseph Lindon Smith (1863-1950), illustrates the vast quantities of fruit he is consuming in Venice - *Melons, pears, peaches, plums, apples, figs, grapes, and other things unknown to my interior.* He also mentions the arrival of the “Bostonians,” his social events, and the sale of his pictures to Isabella Stewart Gardner, September 8, 1894. Joseph Linden Smith papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Joseph Lindon Smith to Parents

Joseph Lindon Smith to Parents, June 15, 1894

Creator: Joseph Lindon Smith

Painter Joseph Lindon Smith (1863?1950) writes to his parents of his financial success in Venice, *Behold your son painting under a shower of gold,* June 15, 1894. Joseph Lindon Smith papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Moses Soyer letter to David Soyer

Moses Soyer letter to David Soyer, 1940

Creator: Moses Soyer

Social realist painter Moses Soyer (1899-1974) expressed parental love in his letters to his only son, David, who at age twelve was away at summer camp in 1940. David's mother Ida designed needlepoint patterns. Her employer had a relative, a young boy, who had recently escaped Vienna. Ida arranged for him to attend summer camp. In the same way that Soyer's paintings have an undercurrent of social concern, here he asks his son to be kind to the young refugee. Whittey and Brownie, pictured here, are camp horses.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Moses Soyer letter to David Soyer

Moses Soyer letter to David Soyer, 1940

Creator: Moses Soyer

Painter Moses Soyer (1899-1974) sent what he called a "puzzle picture" to his son David, who was away at a camp in the Catskills in the summer of 1940. In a watercolor vignette, he pictures the family dog and cat, Tinkerbell and Jester, along with the words "Where is Jester" (the answer is, hiding under the dog).
Soyer also prominently features baseball great Dizzy Dean, who was about to make a comeback in the minor league. He mentions that the Cincinnati Reds are in the lead. (They would win the World Series that year.) The baseball banter carries over to the margin, where Soyer sends a glove flying from their home at 432 West Street in New York to David's bunk at Camp Quannacut.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Walt Kuhn to Eloise Spaeth

Walt Kuhn to Eloise Spaeth, between 1937 and 1949

Creator: Walt Kuhn

Get well wishes from painter Walt Kuhn (1877-1949) to Eloise Spaeth (d. 1998), collector and Chair Emeritus of the Archives of American Art Board of Trustees. Eloise Spaeth papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Gaston Longchamp to Marguerite Stix

Gaston Longchamp to Marguerite Stix, ca. 1955

Creator: Gaston Longchamp

Letter from Gaston Longchamp to Marguerite [Stix] and Co., describing a birthday dinner for his dog Zoto, and picturing the artist seated at a table with Zoto, two nude women, and a pig about to feast on a *sole Normande,* ca. 1955. In 1955, Longchamp was involved in the Artist Gallery 20th Anniversary Show, which Hugh Stix (Marguerite’s husband) curated. Hugh Stix papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Gaston Longchamp to [?] Goldberg

Gaston Longchamp to [?] Goldberg, ca. 1956

Creator: Gaston Longchamp

Letter from Gaston Longchamp to *Mr. and Mrs. Goldberg* including his illustration of a man eating crow and a night scene of the artist and his dog peering around the corner of their house and seeing a wolf, ca. 1956. Hugh Stix papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Allen Tupper True to Emma Eaton

Allen Tupper True to Emma Eaton, Dec. 1, 1913

Creator: Allen Tupper True

Letter from Allen Tupper True (1881–1955) to his fiancée Emma Eaton, December 1, 1913, in which True describes his journey to visit English painter Frank *F.B.* Brangwyn (1867–1956) and Brangwyn’s two studios at Hammersmith and Baron’s Court, the latter close to where True was lodging. He writes about how excited he is to be working again: *How glad this fool person is going to be to get to work once more! It was been months since I’ve done any real work and you know that means. I am going to dig like an old foal at it. But thank heaven I learned some years ago that it cannot all be done in a minute. I’ll have to go slowly and by making myself invaluable to F.B. can in time work into a very fine opportunity for learning.* Allen Tupper True and True Family papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Allen Tupper True to Jane True

Allen Tupper True to Jane True, 1927

Creator: Allen Tupper True

Letter from Allen Tupper True (1881–1955) to his daughter Jane. 1927. Allen Tupper True and True Family papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Allen Tupper True letter to Jane True

Allen Tupper True letter to Jane True, 1927

Creator: Allen Tupper True

Letter from Allen Tupper True (1881–1955) to his daughter Jane. 1927. Allen Tupper True and True Family papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alexander Calder to Keith Warner

Alexander Calder to Keith Warner, May 20, 1947

Creator: Alexander Calder

Letter from sculptor Alexander Calder (1898-1976) to collector Keith Warner, May 20, 1947, showing his ideas for a bracelet in gold wire for Mrs. Warner. Keith Warner papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Thomas Eakins to Alexander Francis Harmer

Thomas Eakins to Alexander Francis Harmer, Nov. 9, 1882

Creator: Thomas Eakins

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

William Zorach to John Weichsel

William Zorach to John Weichsel, Oct. 18, 1917

Creator: William Zorach

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Ione Robinson to Julian E. (Julian Edwin) Levi

Ione Robinson to Julian E. (Julian Edwin) Levi, Jan. 21, 1937

Creator: Ione Robinson

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Julian E. (Julian Edwin) Levi to Mrs. Julian Levi

Julian E. (Julian Edwin) Levi to Mrs. Julian Levi, ca. 1932

Creator: Julian E. (Julian Edwin) Levi

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Man Ray to Julian E. (Julian Edwin) Levi

Man Ray to Julian E. (Julian Edwin) Levi, 1929 June 26

Creator: Man Ray

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Robert Frederick Blum to Minnie Gerson

Robert Frederick Blum to Minnie Gerson, Dec. 6, 1883

Creator: Robert Frederick Blum

Painter and illustrator Robert Frederick Blum (1857-1903) wrote this letter to "Miss Minnie [Gerson]," sketching his idea for her family’s Christmas card, ca. 1880.

He jokingly wrote: "It is fatal to be afflicted with inspiration that won't be controlled."

On the last page he described the sights and sounds outside his window: "the hand organ with its cheerful waltzes toots and groans its hacking and rheumatic notes through it all."

Robert Frederick Blum papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Reginald Marsh to John Steuart Curry

Reginald Marsh to John Steuart Curry, ca. June 1942

Creator: Reginald Marsh

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

John Von Wicht to Will Barnet

John Von Wicht to Will Barnet, Aug. 14, 1956

Creator: John Von Wicht

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Thomas Eakins to Fanny Eakins

Thomas Eakins to Fanny Eakins, Nov. 13, 1867

Creator: Thomas Eakins

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Waldo Peirce to Sally Jane Davis

Waldo Peirce to Sally Jane Davis, Apr. 25, 1943

Creator: Waldo Peirce

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Robert Frederick Blum to Otto H. (Otto Henry) Bacher

Robert Frederick Blum to Otto H. (Otto Henry) Bacher, Nov. 20, 1890

Creator: Robert Frederick Blum

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Jim Nutt to Don Baum

Jim Nutt to Don Baum, between 1966 and 1990

Creator: Jim Nutt

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Philip Guston to James Brooks

Philip Guston to James Brooks, between 1938 and 1980

Creator: Philip Guston

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Robert Frederick Blum to Otto H. (Otto Henry) Bacher

Robert Frederick Blum to Otto H. (Otto Henry) Bacher, July 18-23, 1887

Creator: Robert Frederick Blum

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Edgar Spier Cameron to Parents

Edgar Spier Cameron to Parents, 1884 Aug. 7

Creator: Edgar Spier Cameron

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Max Bohm to Emilie Bohm

Max Bohm to Emilie Bohm, May 12, 1889

Creator: Max Bohm

Letter from Max Bohm (1868–1923) to his mother Emilie Bohm, May 12, 1889, describing his first "vernisage" at the Paris Universal Exposition of 1889:

"I wore a simple Prince Albert, black kid gloves, white tie and high hat and did not look bad (pas mal). We spent five hours in the Salon and amused ourselves greatly... Never in the whole world has such a world exhibition been arranged as this one... Everything is done in almost unbelievable splendor and artistic elegance. One can see everything the world has to offer in art, science, curiosities and industry. You can't picture the grandeur and splendor to be seen now in Paris. And all that for 14 cents" (original in German).

Max Bohm papers.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Bolton Brown to Eddie Brown

Bolton Brown to Eddie Brown, 1887 July 30

Creator: Bolton Brown

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alexander Calder to Agnes Rindge Claflin

Alexander Calder to Agnes Rindge Claflin, June 6, 1936

Creator: Alexander Calder

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alexander Calder to Keith Warner

Alexander Calder to Keith Warner, May 20, 1947

Creator: Alexander Calder

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Warren Chappell to Isabel Bishop

Warren Chappell to Isabel Bishop, Oct. 27, 1982

Creator: Warren Chappell

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Howard Finster letter to Barbara Shissler Nosanow

Howard Finster letter to Barbara Shissler Nosanow, 1981

Creator: Howard Finster

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

John Frazee to Lydia Frazee

John Frazee to Lydia Frazee, May 18, 1834

Creator: John Frazee

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1913 Mar. 21

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh letter to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh letter to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1913 Jan. 29

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, Sept. 17, 1912

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Winslow Homer to Gustav Reicard

Winslow Homer to Gustav Reicard, Mar. 17, 1893

Creator: Winslow Homer

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Rockwell Kent to Frances Kent

Rockwell Kent to Frances Kent, 1931 July 16

Creator: Rockwell Kent

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Walt Kuhn, New York, N.Y. letter to Vera Kuhn

Walt Kuhn, New York, N.Y. letter to Vera Kuhn, 1912 Dec. 14

Creator: Walt Kuhn

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Walt Kuhn to Eloise Spaeth

Walt Kuhn to Eloise Spaeth, between 1937 and 1949

Creator: Walt Kuhn

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Frederic Edwin Church to Martin Johnson Heade.

Frederic Edwin Church to Martin Johnson Heade., 1870 Mar. 7

Creator: Frederic Edwin Church

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

R. Lortac to Edward Willis Redfield

R. Lortac to Edward Willis Redfield, Aug. 18, [ca. 1919]

Creator: R. Lortac

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Miné Okubo to Roy Leeper

Miné Okubo to Roy Leeper, May 18, 1971

Creator: Miné Okubo

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Gio Ponti to Esther McCoy

Gio Ponti to Esther McCoy, ca. 1978

Creator: Gio Ponti

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Eero Saarinen to Aline B. (Aline Bernstein) Saarinen

Eero Saarinen to Aline B. (Aline Bernstein) Saarinen, 1953

Creator: Eero Saarinen

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

John French Sloan letter to Walter Pach

John French Sloan letter to Walter Pach, 1922 Aug. 4

Creator: John French Sloan

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

John Sloan letter to Walter Pach

John Sloan letter to Walter Pach, 1920 June 9

Creator: John French Sloan

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Joseph Lindon Smith letter to his parents

Joseph Lindon Smith letter to his parents, 1894 Sept. 8

Creator: Joseph Lindon Smith

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Joseph Lindon Smith to  Parents

Joseph Lindon Smith to Parents, ca. May 1891

Creator: Joseph Lindon Smith

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Moses Soyer letter to David Soyer

Moses Soyer letter to David Soyer, 1940

Creator: Moses Soyer

Social realist painter Moses Soyer (1899-1974) expressed parental love in his letters to his only son, David, who at age twelve was away at summer camp in 1940. David's mother Ida designed needlepoint patterns. Her employer had a relative, a young boy, who had recently escaped Vienna. Ida arranged for him to attend summer camp. In the same way that Soyer's paintings have an undercurrent of social concern, here he asks his son to be kind to the young refugee. Whittey and Brownie, pictured here, are camp horses.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Moses Soyer letter to David Soyer

Moses Soyer letter to David Soyer, 1940

Creator: Moses Soyer

Painter Moses Soyer (1899-1974) sent what he called a "puzzle picture" to his son David, who was away at a camp in the Catskills in the summer of 1940. In a watercolor vignette, he pictures the family dog and cat, Tinkerbell and Jester, along with the words "Where is Jester" (the answer is, hiding under the dog).
Soyer also prominently features baseball great Dizzy Dean, who was about to make a comeback in the minor league. He mentions that the Cincinnati Reds are in the lead. (They would win the World Series that year.) The baseball banter carries over to the margin, where Soyer sends a glove flying from their home at 432 West Street in New York to David's bunk at Camp Quannacut.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Dorothea Tanning to Joseph Cornell

Dorothea Tanning to Joseph Cornell, Apr. 29, 1947

Creator: Dorothea Tanning

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Allen Tupper True letter to Jane True

Allen Tupper True letter to Jane True, 1927

Creator: Allen Tupper True

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

George Benjamin Luks letter to Everett Shinn

George Benjamin Luks letter to Everett Shinn, 1900 May 18

Creator: George Benjamin Luks

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Betty Parsons to H. E. (Henry Ernest) Schnakenberg

Betty Parsons to H. E. (Henry Ernest) Schnakenberg, between 1930 and 1969

Creator: Betty Parsons

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Paul Bransom to Grace Bransom

Paul Bransom to Grace Bransom, ca. 1905

Creator: Paul Bransom

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Rockwell Kent to Frances Kent

Rockwell Kent to Frances Kent, ca. 1926 Sept. 13

Creator: Rockwell Kent

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Arthur Garfield Dove to Suzanne Mullett Smith

Arthur Garfield Dove to Suzanne Mullett Smith, Mar. 15, 1944

Creator: Arthur Garfield Dove

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Oscar Fabres to Russell Lynes

Oscar Fabres to Russell Lynes, June 25, 1959

Creator: Oscar Fabres

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Louis M. (Louis Michel) Eilshemius to Hyman Kaitz

Louis M. (Louis Michel) Eilshemius to Hyman Kaitz, ca. 1933

Creator: Louis M. (Louis Michel) Eilshemius

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Yves Saint-Laurent to Alexander Liberman

Yves Saint-Laurent to Alexander Liberman, ca. 1970 June 7

Creator: Yves Saint-Laurent

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Walt Kuhn to Vera Kuhn

Walt Kuhn to Vera Kuhn, Sept. 25, 1912

Creator: Walt Kuhn

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Walt Kuhn to Vera Kuhn

Walt Kuhn to Vera Kuhn, 1913 July 20

Creator: Walt Kuhn

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Richard Kozlow to Lester Arwin

Richard Kozlow to Lester Arwin, 1961 Jan. 19

Creator: Richard M. Kozlow

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Paul Bransom letter to Kicki Hays

Paul Bransom letter to Kicki Hays, 1947 Oct. 17

Creator: Paul Bransom

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Charles N. (Charles Nicholas) Sarka to Paul Bransom

Charles N. (Charles Nicholas) Sarka to Paul Bransom, 1917 Apr. 18

Creator: Charles N. (Charles Nicholas) Sarka

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

William Cushing Loring to Parents

William Cushing Loring to Parents, 1901 July 14

Creator: William Cushing Loring

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry to Hedda Sterne

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry to Hedda Sterne, ca. 1943

Creator: Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Winslow Homer to George G. Briggs

Winslow Homer to George G. Briggs, 1896 Feb. 19

Creator: Winslow Homer

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Rutherford Boyd to Fiancée

Rutherford Boyd to Fiancée, 1905 June 22

Creator: Rutherford Boyd

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Lyonel Feininger to Alfred Churchill

Lyonel Feininger to Alfred Churchill, 1890 May 20

Creator: Lyonel Feininger

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

William Trost Richards to Mr. Whitney

William Trost Richards to Mr. Whitney, 1876 July 30

Creator: William Trost Richards

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

J. Kathleen White letter to Ellen H. Johnson

J. Kathleen White letter to Ellen H. Johnson, 1986 Sept. 1

Creator: J. Kathleen White

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Thomas Hart Benton to James Brooks

Thomas Hart Benton to James Brooks, 1933 Aug. 5

Creator: Thomas Hart Benton

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Joseph Lindon Smith letter to Brother

Joseph Lindon Smith letter to Brother, between 1890 and 1950

Creator: Joseph Lindon Smith

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Ray Johnson, N.Y. letter to Lucy R. Lippard

Ray Johnson, N.Y. letter to Lucy R. Lippard, 1970 July 3

Creator: Ray Johnson

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Thomas Eakins to William Trost Richards

Thomas Eakins to William Trost Richards, 1877 June 19

Creator: Thomas Eakins

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Paul Manship to Leon Kroll

Paul Manship to Leon Kroll, ca. 1935

Creator: Paul Howard Manship

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Michael Lucero, New York, N.Y. letter to Patti Warashina

Michael Lucero, New York, N.Y. letter to Patti Warashina, 1979 Nov.

Creator: Michael Lucero

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Andy Warhol letter to Russell Lynes

Andy Warhol letter to Russell Lynes, 1949

Creator: Andy Warhol

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

John Steuart Curry to Margaret D. Engle

John Steuart Curry to Margaret D. Engle, 1942, Mar. 11

Creator: John Steuart Curry

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

David Carlson to Miss Jackson

David Carlson to Miss Jackson, 1952 Jan. 6

Creator: David Carlson

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

H. C. (Horace Clifford) Westermann letter to Clayton Bailey

H. C. (Horace Clifford) Westermann letter to Clayton Bailey, 1963 Nov. 17

Creator: H. C. (Horace Clifford) Westermann

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

William Wegman letter to Athena Tacha

William Wegman letter to Athena Tacha, ca. 1974

Creator: William Wegman

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Timothy Cole to William Lewis Fraser

Timothy Cole to William Lewis Fraser, 1884 Apr. 21

Creator: Timothy Cole

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Bolton Brown to Eddie Brown

Bolton Brown to Eddie Brown, 1888 June 25-27

Creator: Bolton Brown

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Lyonel Feininger to Alfred Churchill

Lyonel Feininger to Alfred Churchill, 1890 Oct. 7

Creator: Lyonel Feininger

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Marcel Duchamp to Jean Crotti

Marcel Duchamp to Jean Crotti, 1918 July 8

Creator: Marcel Duchamp

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

George Grosz to Erich S. Herrmann

George Grosz to Erich S. Herrmann, ca. 1940

Creator: George Grosz

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Kenyon Cox to Parents

Kenyon Cox to Parents, 1877 Feb. 7

Creator: Kenyon Cox

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Maynard Dixon to William Macbeth

Maynard Dixon to William Macbeth, 1923 June 26

Creator: Maynard Dixon

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1912 Oct.

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Joseph Lindon Smith to Parents

Joseph Lindon Smith to Parents, June 15, 1894

Creator: Joseph Lindon Smith

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Gaston Longchamp to [?] Goldberg

Gaston Longchamp to [?] Goldberg, ca. 1956

Creator: Gaston Longchamp

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Dale Chihuly to Italo Scanga

Dale Chihuly to Italo Scanga, Aug. 1, 1995

Creator: Dale Chihuly

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Gio Ponti to Esther McCoy

Gio Ponti to Esther McCoy, 1968 Apr. 28

Creator: Gio Ponti

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli

Alfred Joseph Frueh to Giuliette Fanciulli, 1913 Jan. 10

Creator: Alfred Joseph Frueh

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Edith Schloss letter to Philip and Dorothy Pearlstein

Edith Schloss letter to Philip and Dorothy Pearlstein, 1981 March 25

Creator: Edith Schloss

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Walt Kuhn to Parents

Walt Kuhn to Parents, 1903 June 10

Creator: Walt Kuhn

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

William Wegman letter to Ellen H. Johnson and Athena Tacha

William Wegman letter to Ellen H. Johnson and Athena Tacha, 1974 Apr. 19

Creator: William Wegman

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Jim Maley letter to Russell Lynes

Jim Maley letter to Russell Lynes, between 1946 and 1962

Creator: Jim Maley

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Thomas Hart Benton to Sanford Law

Thomas Hart Benton to Sanford Law, 1964 May 19

Creator: Thomas Hart Benton

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Beth Von Hoesen to Daniel Marcus Mendelowitz

Beth Von Hoesen to Daniel Marcus Mendelowitz, 1975 Oct. 27

Creator: Beth Von Hoesen

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Charles N. (Charles Nicholas) Sarka to Paul Bransom

Charles N. (Charles Nicholas) Sarka to Paul Bransom, 1913 Nov. 16

Creator: Charles N. (Charles Nicholas) Sarka

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Charles N. (Charles Nicholas) Sarka to Paul Bransom

Charles N. (Charles Nicholas) Sarka to Paul Bransom, 1950 Aug. 8

Creator: Charles N. (Charles Nicholas) Sarka

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Bernard Leach to Warren MacKenzie

Bernard Leach to Warren MacKenzie, 1961 Sept. 25

Creator: Bernard Leach

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Ray Johnson to Geoffrey Clements

Ray Johnson to Geoffrey Clements, Dec. 5, 1967

Creator: Ray Johnson

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Roy Fox Lichtenstein, New York, N.Y. letter to Samuel J. Wagstaff

Roy Fox Lichtenstein, New York, N.Y. letter to Samuel J. Wagstaff, 1971, Feb. 22

Creator: Roy Fox Lichtenstein

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Abbott Handerson Thayer to Everton Painsbury

Abbott Handerson Thayer to Everton Painsbury, 1882 Jan. 16

Creator: Abbott Handerson Thayer

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Red Grooms and Mimi Gross Grooms to Elisse and Paul Suttman and Edward C. Flood

Red Grooms and Mimi Gross Grooms to Elisse and Paul Suttman and Edward C. Flood, 1968

Creator: Red Grooms

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Gio Ponti to Esther McCoy

Gio Ponti to Esther McCoy, ca. Oct. 1966

Creator: Gio Ponti

One of a series of affection letters from architect Gio Ponti to architectural historian Esther McCoy. Ponti's concept of total design extended to his personal letters, which evoke a magical sense of fantasy, love, and lightness.

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Samuel Finley Breese Morse, New York, N.Y. letter to Elizabeth Breese

Samuel Finley Breese Morse, New York, N.Y. letter to Elizabeth Breese, 1827 Jan. 20

Creator: Samuel Finley Breese Morse

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More Than Words: Illustrated Letters from the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Alexander Calder to Ben Shahn

Alexander Calder to Ben Shahn, 1949 Feb. 24

Creator: Alexander Calder

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