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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

September 26, 2014 to February 28, 2015

Reading an artist’s diary is the next best thing to being there. Direct and private, diaries provide firsthand accounts of appointments made and met, places seen, and work in progress—all laced with personal ruminations, name-dropping, and the occasional sketch or doodle. Whether recording historic events or simple day-to-day moments, these diary entries evoke the humanity of these artists and their moment in time.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Bernarda Bryson Shahn appointment book

Bernarda Bryson Shahn appointment book, 1972-2002

Creator: Bernarda Bryson

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

William Penhallow Henderson diary

William Penhallow Henderson diary, 1902

Creator: William Penhallow Henderson

JANUARY 1, 1902 On the first day of 1902, fresh off the boat from the United States, William Penhallow Henderson began a travel diary of his trip through Europe. In his first entry, written in Paris, Henderson wonders if he will be able to keep a daily account. HAD A DIARY WHEN I WAS A KID, he wrote, IT STOPS THE DAY I GOT MY FIRST BICYCLE. WONDER WHAT SORT OF WHEEL WILL STOP THIS ONE. Henderson remained dedicated to his diary, writing about visits to museums, galleries, and restaurants throughout Europe.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

John Storrs diary

John Storrs diary, 1909-1919

Creator: John Henry Bradley Storrs

JANUARY 1, 1917 Chicago-born John Storrs was living in Orleans, France, when Germany declared war in 1914. Though his diary entries are sporadic, in a soul-searching entry from Orleans on January 1, 1917, he asked himself if he is doing enough for the war effort: ARE YOU DOING YOUR PART? ARE YOU DOING ANYTHING OR LEAVING ANYTHING UNDONE THAT YOU SHALL LATER REGRET? Later that year, he worked at a military hospital sponsored by the Red Cross.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Karl and Marion Zerbe diary

Karl and Marion Zerbe diary, 1940

Creator: Karl Zerbe

DECEMBER 31, 1940 German-born expressionist Karl Zerbe and his wife, Marion, often hosted New Year’s Eve parties for their circle of friends in the Boston art scene. His diary entries on January 1 provide a colorful record of these events. The handmade menus and snapshots of decorated rooms suggest the gaiety of the night’s festivities, along with Zerbe’s reflections on his hangover.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Karl and Marion Zerbe diary

Karl and Marion Zerbe diary, 1941

Creator: Karl Zerbe

JANUARY 1, 1941 German-born expressionist Karl Zerbe and his wife, Marion, often hosted New Year’s Eve parties for their circle of friends in the Boston art scene. His diary entries on January 1 provide a colorful record of these events. The handmade menus and snapshots of decorated rooms suggest the gaiety of the night’s festivities, along with Zerbe’s reflections on his hangover.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Harrison Cady diary

Harrison Cady diary, 1950

Creator: Harrison Cady

JANUARY 1, 1950 Harrison Cady was known for charming illustrations for Thornton W. Burgess’s children’s stories, particularly The Adventures of Peter Cottontail. For seven decades Cady’s illustrations also appeared in the Saturday Evening Post, Ladies’ Home Journal, Good Housekeeping, and other publications. In a preface to his 1950 diary, Cady reflects on highs and lows of the first half of the 20th century, including the Great Depression and motion pictures, and then prepares to ride into the future: UP WE GO AND INTO THE SADDLE AND AWAY ON 1950.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Blanche Lazzell diary

Blanche Lazzell diary, 1899-1900

Creator: Blanche Lazzell

APRIL 7, 1900 Blanche Lazzell committed her most intimate thoughts to her diary. She wrote, THIS BOOK IS NOT INTENDED FOR OTHER EYES THAN THE WRITER’S, AND WHEN THEY ARE FOREVER CLOSED, I HOPE THIS BOOK WILL BE LAID IN THE FIRE. THIS IS ONLY A JOURNAL OF MY OUTWARD LIFE … GOD ALONE KEEPS RECORD OF THE REST. After graduating in 1905, Lazzell took up printmaking in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Olive Rush diary fragments

Olive Rush diary fragments, between 1890 and 1907

Creator: Olive Rush

AUGUST 6, 1890 When Olive Rush discovered an old diary on a summer day in 1890, she eagerly renewed her commitment to writing more regularly. HA, HA, OLD JOURNAL, I’VE FOUND YOU AT LAST! LOST SO LONG, YOU NOW COME TO ME TO TELL ME OF A FEW OF MY MORE YOUTHFUL DAYS. AND I INTEND TO SCRIBBLE IN YOU AGAIN. Rush’s enthusiasm continued as she wrote of her plans to attend Earlham College in Indiana to study painting.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Jack Tworkov diary

Jack Tworkov diary, 1953 August 13-1962 April 30

Creator: Jack Tworkov

DECEMBER 25, 1954 Jack Tworkov was an intellectual and contemplative artist. This diary, spanning the years 1953 to1962, features intermittent but often profound entries. On Christmas Eve, 1954, Tworkov wrote, I BEGIN TO WONDER ABOUT THESE PAGES. WHAT ARE THEY FOR? WHY DO I WRITE THESE ENTRIES? PARTLY THEY SATISFY MY LOVE OF RECORDS—A MANIFESTATION OF EGO. PARTLY THEY CONSTITUTE AN EFFORT…TO DISCOVER MY TRUE EMOTIONS. PARTLY THEY ARE A LITERARY EFFORT… NOT WITHOUT A DESIRE THAT THEY SOMETIME IN THE FUTURE BE READ, IF ONLY BY THOSE WHO KNOW ME.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Oscar Bluemner painting diary

Oscar Bluemner painting diary, 1911 June 12 - 1912 Jan. 30

Creator: Oscar Bluemner

NOVEMBER 23 1911 Oscar Bluemner’s art evolved directly from his painting diaries, which he kept from 1911 to 1936. Trained as an architect in Germany, Bluemner had an architect’s penchant for planning. On walking tours of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, with his painting diary in hand, he made rough outlines of landscapes and plotted complex color arrangements. Each sketch from nature was a blueprint of light, line, mass, shadow, and color. Later he embellished his books with additional studies and extensive notes. ONE RULE, wrote Bluemner, DRAW AND PAINT, EQUALLY, CONSTANTLY, SEPARATELY, THINKING, FEELING.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Helen Torr Dove and Arthur Dove diary

Helen Torr Dove and Arthur Dove diary, 1936

Creator: Helen Torr Dove

SEPTEMBER 28–29, 1936 The daily activities of Arthur Dove were typically recorded by his wife, Helen Torr Dove. But in 1936, Helen had to abruptly leave the family farm in Geneva, New York, to help her ailing mother. Dove assumed diary duties in her absence. He often recorded the temperature and barometric pressure in notes on the day’s weather. For a span of three months, he sketched enigmatic circles. Perhaps the multi-colored shadings were Dove’s system for tracking the phases of the moon. Shortly after the diary ended, Dove depicted the moon in two paintings, The Moon Was Laughing at Me and Me and the Moon.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Dorr Bothwell diary

Dorr Bothwell diary, 1926-1929

Creator: Dorr Hodgson Bothwell

MAY 21–MAY 22, 1928 California painter Dorr Bothwell spent two years living on the island of Ta`?, Samoa, during her late 20s. Her encounter with Samoan culture broadened her world view, and she used her diary to record her observations of Samoan art and adornment. She described painting a portrait of an acquaintance, Alipati, who posed with A RED HIBISCUS OVER ONE EAR & WEARING A BRILLIANT GREEN LAVA-LAVA. The following day, she observed women making tapa cloth and described the process for creating patterns: [A WOMAN NAMED EMELE] USES A NUT OR POD WHICH HAS WHISKERS ON THE END FOR THE BRUSH & AFTER DIVIDING OFF THE SPACE SHE GOES RIGHT AHEAD & DRAWS IN THE DESIGN.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Joseph Cornell diary entry

Joseph Cornell diary entry, 1946 May 17

Creator: Joseph Cornell

MAY 7, 1946 In his diary, as in his art, Cornell struggled to hold on to life’s evanescence. He wrote on scraps of paper—the backs of envelopes, magazine clippings, wrapping papers—recording his impressions of music, art, ballet, his boxes, and the intertwined sensations of seeing, feeling, and remembering. On the night of May 17, 1946, Cornell wrote: DREAMS RECENTLY JUST AS INTENSE IN EMOTION AND BEAUTY (AND EVEN MORE PROLONGED AND ELABORATE THAN FRAGMENTS FORMERLY RECORDED) BUT HARDER TO GET A HOLD OF AT ANY POINT TO RECORD. MANY WONDERFUL VISIONS OF THE NIGHT HAVE SLIPPED AWAY SEEMINGLY CASUAL BUT ACTUAL AS INTENSE AS ABOVE. In the margin he added, FRIDAY SUCCESSION OF IMAGES, WARM, COMFORTING, FRIENDLY.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Joseph Cornell diary entry

Joseph Cornell diary entry, 1948 July 10

Creator: Joseph Cornell

JULY 10, 1948 Cornell had an enormous capacity for joy. In his entry from July 10, 1948, he commented on the POETIC INTOXICATION of his own happiness.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Reuben Tam diary entry

Reuben Tam diary entry, 1939 March 27

Creator: Reuben Tam

FEBRUARY 24 AND MARCH 7, 1939 Born and raised in Kapa’a, Hawaii, Reuben Tam was best known for his expressionistic landscapes of land meeting the sea. The artist appreciated the splendor of the islands, often reflecting on subtle changes of the unique terrain in his diary. In one instance he described sudden beauty of the sky, TO ME, THE WORLD IS EVER NEW, EVER CHANGING, FOR I PERCEIVE WITHOUT WORDS, WITHOUT CONCEPTS … I AM FREE; I CAN NEVER KNOW THE COMFORT OF OBJECTIVE UNDERSTANDING—THAT IS THE PRICE EXACTED OF HE WHO WALKS IN THE WORLD OF WONDERFUL, BEAUTIFUL CHAOS.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Reuben Tam poem, Converted native

Reuben Tam poem, Converted native, 1939 March 5?

Creator: Reuben Tam

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Reuben Tam diary entry

Reuben Tam diary entry, 1939 February 24

Creator: Reuben Tam

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Reuben Tam diary entry

Reuben Tam diary entry, 1939 May 8

Creator: Reuben Tam

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Diary entry, which recounts the news of President Abraham Lincoln's assassination and funeral procession

Diary entry, which recounts the news of President Abraham Lincoln's assassination and funeral procession, 1865 Apr.

Creator: Rubens Peale

APRIL 23, 1865 Peale was 81 when he recorded the assassination of Abraham Lincoln on April 15, 1865. On April 23, Peale stood in line for most of the morning attempting to view Lincoln’s body in Philadelphia, but pressing crowds forced him to give up. That evening he and his daughter Mary were allowed to enter a back door: A FINE OPPORTUNITY OF VIEWING THE CORPSE AND DECORATIONS OF THE HALL, WHICH WAS TOTALLY COVERED WITH BLACK CLOTH EXCEPT THE STATUE & PORTRAITS OF GENERAL WASHINGTON & WIFE. I STAID [SIC] ONE HOUR AND LEFT MARY GAZING ON THE CORPSE, SHE INTENDING TO PAINT A PORTRAIT OF HIM.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Henry Mosler Civil War diary

Henry Mosler Civil War diary, 1862

Creator: Henry Mosler

OCTOBER 9, 1862 Born in New York City, Henry Mosler first gained recognition in 1862 as a Civil War illustrator for Harper’s Weekly. Mosler, then 21, kept a small pocket diary in 1862 while serving with the Union Army in Kentucky as a volunteer aide-de-camp to General R.W. Johnson and as an artist correspondent for Harper’s. Though only 37 pages long, the diary provides a firsthand account of the suffering and weariness of war. He wrote, TODAY WE SKIRMISHED AND ADVANCED IN LINE OF BATTLE IN PERRYVILLE AND FOUND IT EVACUATED. IN THE EVENING COL. BLAKE COTTON AND MYSELF WENT OUT TO VIEW THE BATTLEFIELD WHICH WAS A SIGHT THAT I HAVE NOT THE POWER TO EXPRESS.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Cecilia Beaux diary

Cecilia Beaux diary, 1912

Creator: Cecilia Beaux

APRIL 16, 1912 Cecilia Beaux’s talents as a portrait painter were highly sought after during the late 1800s and early 1900s. In April 1912, she was working in New York on a series of portrait commissions from the social and political elite, when news of the sinking of the Titanic reached the United States. Beaux was strongly affected by the incident; she wrote, NO ONE SPEAKS OF ANYTHING BUT THE GREAT HORROR. A MOST UNJUST AND UNNECESSARY BLUNDER OR RATHER STUPID RECKLESS CARELESSNESS OF EVERYTHING BY SPEED FOR THE RICH. I AM KEEPING THE RECORD.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Abraham Rattner diary

Abraham Rattner diary, 1939 September 1 - October 28

Creator: Abraham Rattner

SEPTEMBER 1, 1939 Born in Poughkeepsie, New York, Abraham Rattner studied at the Corcoran School of Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. After traveling abroad in 1919 on a year-long scholarship he established a studio in Paris, where he remained until September 1939 and the beginning of World War II. Rattner wrote about fleeing Paris. On September 1, Germany invaded Poland, and on September 3, France, along with Great Britain, Australia, and New Zealand, declared war on Germany.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

William Christopher diary of march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama

William Christopher diary of march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, 1965 March 13-15

Creator: William R. (William Rodolphus) Christopher

MARCH 15, 1965 In March 1965, artist-activist William Christopher traveled to Selma, Alabama, in support of the Civil Rights Movement. In the previous week, state troopers had attacked protest marchers in Selma, and a white mob inflicted a fatal beating on James Reeb, a Unitarian minister. On March 15, Christopher attended Reeb’s memorial service, at which Martin Luther King Jr. delivered the eulogy. Afterwards, Christopher joined the crowd that marched with Dr. King to the Selma courthouse to lay a wreath in Reeb’s honor.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Janice Lowry journal 93

Janice Lowry journal 93, 2001 July 12-December 3

Creator: Janice Ann Lowry

SEPTEMBER 11, 2001 Janice Lowry’s journals are evidence of her passion for assemblage. In each she combines verbal and visual expression with a variety of techniques and material—ink pens, colored pencils, collage materials, stamps, and watercolors—to create highly personal documents that embody her lifelong commitment to the everyday. On September 11, 2001, Lowry commented on terrorist attacks as they unfolded. She concluded that, THE ONLY SOLUTION IS FOR ME TO DO ORDINARY THINGS, JUST REGULAR THINGS.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Gertrude Abercrombie diary

Gertrude Abercrombie diary, 1919 and 1924

Creator: Gertrude Abercrombie

MARCH 24, 1919 Gertrude Abercrombie’s surrealist-inspired work featured fantastical, dreamlike landscapes. Her earliest diary, written when she was ten, gives an endearing record of simple events such as searching for ghosts in spooky basements and playing dolls with friends. She wrote, WE ALWAYS USED TO GO DOWN IN JANE BIGELOW’S BASEMENT AND GO IN THAT CUBBY HOLE AND TELL GHOST STORIES. WE ALL THOUGHT IT WAS A SECRET PASSAGEWAY AND SOMETHING VERY MYSTERIOUS. WE WERE ALL AFRAID OF IT.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Margaret Tupper True diary concerning Allen Tupper True as a baby

Margaret Tupper True diary concerning Allen Tupper True as a baby, 1881-1891

Creator: Margaret Tupper True

MARGARET TUPPER TRUE’S DIARY OF BABY ALLEN TUPPER TRUE AUGUST 29, 1881 Allen Tupper True painted dramatic scenes of the American West. He was born in 1881 in Colorado to Henry True, a cattle rancher and mercantile salesman, and Margaret True, a schoolteacher. Margaret kept a journal during the early years of Allen’s life, lovingly documenting the milestones in his development.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Alson Skinner Clark diary

Alson Skinner Clark diary, 1898

Creator: Alson Skinner Clark

OCTOBER 1, 1898 Alson Clark began art classes at the Art Institute of Chicago at the tender age of 11. In this diary entry, the 22-year-old listed his current activities, including painting, furniture repair, boat-building—and having his good friend Amelia “Mela” Baker to dress him in women’s clothes and pierce his ears in preparation for a party. Clark recounted the day from two perspectives: as a girl and as a boy. From the female vantage point, he wrote, MELA DID MY HAIR. SHE MADE ME A NICE WAIST WITH LACE SLEEVES. WANTED TO WEAR MRS. O’S EARRINGS BUT DIDN’T.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Reginald Marsh diary

Reginald Marsh diary, 1912

Creator: Reginald Marsh

MAY 27, 1912 Though Reginald Marsh was a lifelong free-lance illustrator for the New Yorker, Esquire, and many other national magazines, he is best known for his paintings of New York nightclubs and street scenes in the 1930s and ’40s. Marsh’s 1912 diary, when he was 14, shows his early talent for illustration. On May 27, he sketched and described a recent track practice. The boys rigged together a high jump standard with rope and easels borrowed from Marsh’s father, muralist Fred Dana Marsh.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney journal, vol. 1

Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney journal, vol. 1, 1890 May 10 - September 14

Creator: Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney

MAY 30, 1890 Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney was born into wealth and privilege. As a teenager, she began keeping diaries, a habit she maintained well into her 60s. In 1890 she traveled to Paris, where she visited numerous museums and the newly opened Eiffel Tower and tried her first “gin lime” (also known as a gimlet). On May 30, Whitney confessed that she had not wanted to visit the famous Louvre: I DID NOT MUCH LIKE THE IDEA OF GOING TO THE LOUVRE, I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE STUPID FOR ME, BUT INDEED IT WAS NOT; NO FAR FROM THAT; I ENJOYED IT VERY MUCH. In 1928, Whitney founded the Whitney Studio Club, an art gallery that eventually became the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1931.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Alphaeus P. Cole diary

Alphaeus P. Cole diary, 1889-1890

Creator: Alphaeus Philemon Cole

MAY 31, 1889 Alphaeus Philemon Cole’s interest in art began at a young age, when he traveled to Europe with his family to study painting. At age 13, he was living in Italy and studying with Isaac Craig. In his childhood diaries, he recounts many comic misadventures and pranks. He once tricked his mother into eating snails. I TOLD MAMA WE WERE GOING TO HAVE A KIND OF URB [SIC] FOR SUPPER … AT LAST THE SERVANT CAME UP LAUGHING AND SAID THEY WERE SNAILS … MAMA WAS VERY ANGRIY [SIC] AND …SAID SHE THOUGHT SHE HEARD THEM AND FELT THEM CRAWLING IN HER STOMICK [SIC].

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Charles Green Shaw diary

Charles Green Shaw diary, 1963-1964

Creator: Charles Green Shaw

VOLUME 128, 1963–1964 The visual rhythms of New York City inspired the art and poetry of Charles Green Shaw. He filled more than 145 diaries with accounts his daily routine. Shaw was a creature of habit: he exercised nearly every morning and painted or wrote poetry throughout the day. He reveled in the city’s social scene, frequenting glamorous parties and cultural events. Opposite each entry, he inserted additional details of the day’s events (marked with asterisks): for example, his account of the Kennedy assassination on November 22, 1964, and the shooting of Lee Harvey Oswald two days later.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

William E. L. Bunn diary

William E. L. Bunn diary, 1933

Creator: William E. L. (Edward Lewis) Bunn

1933 William E. L. Bunn was born and raised in Muscatine, Iowa. In 1933, he was an student at the University of Iowa in Iowa City studying theater design and studio arts. His diary tracks his many student activities, including design work on theatrical sets and costumes, coordination of puppet plays, and drawing and painting classes. When possible, the graduate student returned home to Muscatine to stay with his parents and wash his clothes.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Frederick Hammersley diary

Frederick Hammersley diary, 1952-1956, bulk 1952-1954

Creator: Frederick Hammersley

1952–1954 Frederick Hammersley spent most of his career in the Los Angeles area, where he developed colorful paintings in the style known as hard-edge abstraction. In 1951 he began a five-year diary but only persisted through three years. In his small, angular handwriting, he summarized the events of each day, focusing on school and studio work. His handwriting remains consistent through the diary, but each year is carefully colorblocked. As a result, the diary mimics the aesthetic of his paintings.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Europe Diary (July-Sept 1918)

Europe Diary (July-Sept 1918), 1918

Creator: Joseph Lindon Smith

1918 Joseph Lindon Smith was known for his ability to meticulously copy the imagery of ancient tomb sculptures and murals. He traveled extensively to Egypt, Mexico, China, and Southeast Asia to paint. In 1918, he traveled to Europe on an educational mission. Smith managed a team that provided entertainment for troops stationed in France immediately following World War I. In neat, compact writing, he described in detail his work at the YMCA headquarters in France.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Europe Diary (Sept 1918 - March 1919)

Europe Diary (Sept 1918 - March 1919), 1918-1919

Creator: Joseph Lindon Smith

1918 Joseph Lindon Smith was known for his ability to meticulously copy the imagery of ancient tomb sculptures and murals. He traveled extensively to Egypt, Mexico, China, and Southeast Asia to paint. In 1918, he traveled to Europe on an educational mission. Smith managed a team that provided entertainment for troops stationed in France immediately following World War I. In neat, compact writing, he described in detail his work at the YMCA headquarters in France.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Maryette Charlton diary

Maryette Charlton diary, 1979 June 28-October 29

Creator: Maryette Charlton

1979–1980 Maryette Charlton studied in Chicago with Laszlo Moholy-Nagy at the Institute of Design and then moved to New York to continue studying art at the Pratt Institute and Columbia University, where she received a Masters of Fine Arts. Charlton created several films about American artists and became especially close with artist and performer Lillian Kiesler and her husband, surrealist artist Frederick Kiesler. Charlton interspersed her diary entries with poems, inspirational quotations, and drawings.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Diary (Oct 1979 - Sept 1980)

Diary (Oct 1979 - Sept 1980), 1979-1980

Creator: Maryette Charlton

1979–1980 Maryette Charlton studied in Chicago with Laszlo Moholy-Nagy at the Institute of Design and then moved to New York to continue studying art at the Pratt Institute and Columbia University, where she received a Masters of Fine Arts. Charlton created several films about American artists and became especially close with artist and performer Lillian Kiesler and her husband, surrealist artist Frederick Kiesler. Charlton interspersed her diary entries with poems, inspirational quotations, and drawings.

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

Katharine Lane Weems diary

Katharine Lane Weems diary, 1945

Creator: Katharine Ward Lane Weems

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A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art

James Britton diary, vol. XXVI

James Britton diary, vol. XXVI, 1918 September 23 - 1919 January

Creator: James Britton

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