Katherine Dunn Pagon papers relating to the Barnes Foundation, [ca. 1938-1961]

Pagon, Katherine W. Dunn, b. 1892 d. 1988
Painter
Active in Philadelphia, Pa.; Baltimore, Md.

Collection size: 0.4 linear ft. (75 items)

Collection Summary: Letters, notes, writings and printed material collected by Pagon regarding the Barnes Foundation, Albert C. Barnes, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Included are letters, 1948-1952, from Pagon to the editors of Philadelphia area newspapers regarding the Barnes Foundation, and several letters received, 1948-1953, including one from Barnes, 1950; Pagon's notes from a Barnes Foundation class taught by Angelo Pinto, 1946, and other notes; a file containing copies of correspondence between Barnes, Henry Clifford and Fiske Kimball regarding a 1948 Matisse exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art; writings by Barnes, including pamphlets on art education and writings on Fiske Kimball, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the arts in Philadelphia, 1938-1948. Printed material includes a pamphlet, 1938, by Harry Fuiman, "The Progressive Decay of the Pennsylvania Museum of Art," an article on Matisse, and pamphlets and clippings on Barnes and the Foundation, primarily focused on the lawsuit after Barnes' death to force the Foundation to open its gallery to the public, 1943-1961.

Biographical/Historical Note: Painter, Philadelphia, Pa., and Baltimore, Md. Studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts between 1910 and 1918, and later at the Barnes Foundation. Albert C. Barnes was a collector of modern art who acquired over 800 paintings, particularly French Impressionists and other modern painters such as Cezanne, Renoir, Matisse and Picasso. The collection is housed in the Barnes Foundation in Merion, Pa. Barnes directed in his will that the collection never be allowed to tour or be reproduced.

Donated by Pagon's granddaughter, Katherine Pagon Tawney and her husband, Lee Tawney, 1992.

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