Jack Levine papers, 1923-1999

Levine, Jack, b. 1915 d. 2010
Painter
Active in New York, N.Y.; Boston, Mass.

Collection size: 3.2 linear ft.

Collection Summary: The papers of Jack Levine measure 3.2 linear feet and date from 1923-1999. The collection documents Levine's career as a social realist painter and printmaker. Found within the papers are two driver's licenses and several biographical accounts, and scattered letters from colleagues including one each from John Taylor Arms, Hyman Bloom, Leonard Bocour, René d'Harnoncourt, Lloyd Goodrich, Jacob Lawrence, and Homer Saint-Gaudens discussing various art-related events. There is only one carbon copy of a letter written by Levine. The correspondence includes oversized photographs of the members of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Additional photographs of the members are found in the Photograph series.

Biographical/Historical Note: Jack Levine (1915-) is a painter from Boston, Mass. and New York, N.Y. Exponent of Social Realism during the 1930s. He resided in Boston until 1942. Married to painter Ruth Gikow. Graduated from Colby College, in 1946; taught at the Art Institute of Chicago, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and at the American Art School in New York. Levine served as President of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Jack Levine donated portions of the papers in 1962 and 1978, and additional papers in 1999 . The 1999 accession included papers of Levine's wife Ruth Gikow were separated and placed with the Ruth Gikow papers in the Archives.

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