The Jervis McEntee Diaries - November 28, 1887

Diary Entry:

Monday, Nov 28, 1887 Went home on Wednesday by 4 oclock train. It was a dark foggy day. Found Sara alone and very glad to see me. We had our Thanksgiving dinner on Thursday our only guests being Girardie and Dwightie, in marked contrast with the Thanksgiving festivals of other days when the table was set the whole length of the dining room and crowded with friends. We thought and talked of the absent ones and the changes. Indeed all the time I was at home an undertone of sadness rested over the dear old house for I could not help the constant feeling that it is to be ours only a little while longer. I wrote to Lucy on Thursday and to Alice. Friday I went to Kingston and got my fathers watch which Jamie Andrews had left with Safford. Saturday I went over to the Cemetery where Tom has been putting manure on our lot to see how it had [?] the weather was like summer and we had the doors wide open [?] out of the day. I occupied my mothers room. Nannie who was to come up to be under Saras care could not make up her mind to come and was still undecided when I left. Sunday Girard and his boys and I walked over on Mrs. OReillys property where the Toboggan Club has bought a piece of her land. I came down Sunday evening with the 7.45 train and got to my room about 11 most reluctant to leave home and Sara alone. I have no heart for painting and feel unsettled and half sad all the time. I found Ortgies the Auctioneer had been to see me evidently about my sale. It is dark and rainy this morning. I went over to Marys to breakfast. Ellen gave me service alone as no one else was up and I came back to my room without having seen any one. Ortgies again called on me. Some one else wanted my dates for a sale of foreign pictures and I gave it up quite willing to make it later. The dates fixed now are to hang my pictures on Wednesday Feb. 29. Open Thursday March 1 and sell Wednesday 7th. He thinks the law will be amended by that time and would not advise me to sell in the day time. It was too dark to paint much but I kept at work at something. Calvert came back from Baltimore and was at dinner. I felt lonesome and forlorn and wet up to the American Institute and passed the evening.

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