The Jervis McEntee Diaries - October 30, 1876

Diary Entry:

Went up to Marys with her and Julia on Thursday evening. Calvert joined us at the train. He and Bowyer & I had a nice walk Friday to the upper end of the Palisades. The weather was cold & windy. Calvert came to town Saturday but I remained and did not come back until today. Saturday we had a snow squall. Charlotte Olmstead was visiting there and on Sunday Haven Putnam and his wife came up and spent the day. Mary and Calvert are very hospitable on their limited quarters. I had a good quiet time there and was in pretty good spirits the most of the time. I found awaiting me here such a satisfactory letter from Booth to whom I wrote a fortnight ago at San Francisco. It was the very essence of unselfishness and nobility of soul. I had written him my anxieties and he answered immediately to tell me not to worry, that he would be here in a month and would see that I got along with my money matters. I know it would be a real pleasure to him to relieve me from trouble for he has a lovely sense of my disinterested friendship and does not forget how I stood by him in his trouble. He speaks so appreciatively of me and my pictures that it is a great satisfaction to me to reflect that I am capable of exciting such sincere friendship in a man of so fastidious and intense a nature. I am glad to know that some of his ideas of friendship go as far as my own as expressed in a conversation with Calvert only a day or two ago, that between real friends the ideal state would be to give or receive money as one would give or receive any favor. One should be sure of the friendship however. Booth remembers that I offered him all I had when he had failed. Called on Mr. Huntington about the protest of the Committee of Selection. He seemed to thin what I wrote was too long and I fancy too strong. It has ended in my shifting the duty where it rightly belongs to him. We talked of it again at the Council meeting in the evening and he is to write something. I am afraid it will come to nothing.

< Previous Entry | Next Entry >