The Jervis McEntee Diaries - October 23, 1876

Diary Entry:

I went home Saturday by the 11.50 train. Calvert came up by the 3.00 train and I drove to the ferry to meet him, but it was so foggy that the boat did not come over until the arrival of the 4 oclock train and I had to wait there in a drizzle nearly two hours. Sunday was a damp warm day. I had a talk with my father on our affairs. He is hopeful and gave me great encouragement so that I really feel better. Mary and Gussie were up there. Laura is better and will soon be out. Calvert & I came down this morning. Weir came in about 1 o'clock and staid all afternoon explaining to me many things connected with the Centennial awards but while I gathered that he had done his duty and had had a most disagreeable time he said George Ward Nichols had managed the whole thing. The foreign jurors were indifferent and so it went as every thing connected with Art in this country goes. The awards I consider valueless. He however told me privately some encouraging things. That I was the only Artist on whom all the foreign jurors united and that having been there all summer and heard the drift of opinion he had come to the conclusion that I stood highest of any artist in the country and that that was his opinion. I am of course encouraged by this while I cannot be blind to my defects. Went to the Council. Present Perry, Page, Brown, Sontag and myself. No quorum but we admitted a number of students. Pages manner was that of a man who looked upon the whole thing with contempt. I dont know whether he meant it but so it seemed to me. I feel out of my element there and look forward to the winter with any thing but satisfaction. Wrote to Gertrude. The weather is foggy and warm. There was a letter in the Post on Saturday signed an American Artist, regarding the Centennial awards. It was by Whittredge, had good points but was not carefully written. The awards will be of little use to the recipients.

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