David W. Forsberg papers relating to Grace Clements, 1955-1970

Forsberg, David W., b. 1919
Author
Active in Calif.

Collection size: 0.2 linear ft. (34 items).

Collection Summary: 26 letters, 1959 and 1963-1968, between Forsberg and Grace Clements in which they discuss art, astrology and contemporary events; a copy of Clements' last will and testament, dated August 28, 1962; a "Notice of hearing of petition for the removal of executor for the estate of Grace Clements DeLuce" dated November 27, 1970, and carbon of a letter from Forsberg to the attorneys for the petitioner.

Writings by Grace Clements include: a typescript of "An Abstraction is a Reality," 1944, which was published in ARTS AND ARCHITECTURE; scripts for the radio programs "Art in Our Time" (1955), "The Symbols of Christmas" (1955) and "The Art of Teaching Art" (1957) presented over KPFA Radio Station, Berkeley, California; a manuscript entitled "...but is it ART" compiled from articles previously published between 1932-1947 in ARTS AND ARCHITECTURE (clippings of published articles are also included); and the script of a lecture given by Clements at the American Federation of Arts convention, Washington, D.C., 1966, entitled "Plato, Uranus and Modern Art: the Armory Show-1913."

Biographical/Historical Note: David Forsberg and Grace Clements both worked as writers for the magazine ARTS AND ARCHITECTURE from ca. 1943-1949. Forsberg later established the San Francisco Literary Agency; however, this business failed in 1967, and Forsberg went on to a series of free lance writing assignments and other jobs. Grace Clements wrote a regular column for ARTS AND ARCHITECTURE under the heading "An Abstraction is a Reality." She was married to the astrologer Robert De Luce, and was also a serious student of astrology.

Donated 1985 by David W. Forsberg.

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